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View Full Version : Durability of the ECM



GeauxTigers
08-28-2010, 04:14 PM
This is one of those "I never thought this would happen to me" threads. About 3 weeks ago, we were on a small lake south of Salt Lake City and a huge storm caught us out on the water. Before I knew it, water was coming over the bow at a faster rate than the bilge could pump it out (scary!) so we beached the boat thinking we could wait the storm out. Before we knew it, the boat got sideways on the beach and waves kept coming over the transom at a much faster rate than I could bail or the bilge could pump. It was a mess! The water level came up all the way to just below the throttle body. It stayed like this for approximately 4 hours until the storm subsided and we were able to bail it, float it and tow it to the dock.

I took it to my local dealer and they are recommending that we replace the ECM even though no corrosion damage is apparent. Has anyone had a similar experience? At this point, we are putting new plugs, new distributor, new starter etc. Is the ECM at risk?

lewisb13
08-28-2010, 06:15 PM
Wow, you should start a new bilge pump company and call it "Inland Hurricanes". Did you try starting the motor?

GeauxTigers
08-28-2010, 08:16 PM
Wow, you should start a new bilge pump company and call it "Inland Hurricanes". Did you try starting the motor?

LOL! That's a great idea! The park ranger came with a little submersible pump that cranked all the water out in about 30 min. I figure the boat was full enough to have about 1100 gallons of water in it. All in all, that pump was impressive.

The engine does run. I am just worried that the ECM will check out on me in the middle of a lake out here. We typically hang out in some seriously secluded areas where you go several hours without seeing another boat.

mmandley
08-28-2010, 08:48 PM
Honestly i wouldnt worry about the Plugs wires, distro or anyof those items. Not even the starter. You have to remind yourself this is an engine, and its in a boat but also all these compentents are in your car and do you worry about all this getting wet?

Submersed you say? Sure it can cause more issues but it was only like that for a couple hours and you didnt try to power the boat up.

ECM if its in your budget you can buy one but i woulnt just Shot gun repair by replacing everything right away. If you can afford to carry an ECM then get one, plastic bag it and keep it dry. Mainly on all these components is the connectors you have to worry about.

Also as a Tip to everyone, if your getting flooded by a storm or something not only can you switch the bilge on but disconnect all your ballast bags and turn those on as well. Hang the hoses for the rear into the Bilge area and the ski locker pump can be left on to just help water draining into the locker that also drains to the bilge.

Glad to hear you beached it and didnt let her sink. That was smart thinking man.

maxpower220
08-28-2010, 10:20 PM
Replace the oil and tranny fluid, quick. Then start and run the boat. If it doesn't start, then replace parts. Your car engine gets soaked everytime your drive in the rain. This engine isn't that different.


On a related note, my mom got a package from UPS that had been left on the front porch in the rain. She opened the gift (from me) and it was wet. The gift was a shower curtain. She called to ask what she should do, concerning the "damage". I quickly explained that the curtain is designed to get wet and it shouldn't be a problem.

Hoopskier
08-28-2010, 11:07 PM
Replace the oil and tranny fluid, quick. Then start and run the boat. If it doesn't start, then replace parts. Your car engine gets soaked everytime your drive in the rain. This engine isn't that different.

Not exactly the same but similar. I was around when the local waterski team sank one of their boats. It had twin Mercury outboards on the back. Both engines were submerged. When the boat was recovered, did not attempted to initally start the motors, it when in for service. The fluids where changed and everything was dried. The boat was started and put back into service within 48 hrs.

I would agree with others that say change the fluids and go from there. Things will tolerate some water, specifically if you did not attempt to start it, preventing any eletrical shorts. Don't throw money away. As the saying goes, If it aint broke don't fix it.

Sled491
08-29-2010, 11:47 PM
When you go to buy parts for these engines its always a marine grade this or that. I ddoubt you need anything more than a good drying, change your fluids.

WaterBullDawg1980
08-30-2010, 12:06 AM
I would go ahead and buy a starter to replace when that one goes bad. Similar thing happened to me and the starter I had worked fine for a while and then ended up going bad. It was only covered for about 25-30 minutes, but I was told that the starters dont really go bad when you get them wet, but since it was actually under water then they start to rust inside. They will last for a while, possibly even the season, but eventually they will go bad.

Again, I was told this so I do not know it to be fact. But I do know that my starter lasted about 2-3 weeks after it was submersed. Then it went kaput.

EDIT: If you decide to get a starter, they are brainless to replace. I paid someone to replace mine, but after watching him do it, I will do it myself from now on if the need arises.