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cpatten
05-02-2011, 04:54 PM
Both of my axle's gave out on my 1 year old Boatmate trailer. Boatmate in their generousity replaced them both but,....they not only made pay to get them installed at $250.00, I also had to pay to have the boat hoisted to get at the trailer another $200. I love my Moomba but I can't believe that I have have to pay for the labor on a factory issue, less than one year after I bought the boat. :mad:

ian ashton
05-02-2011, 05:07 PM
That stinks.

I actually was planning to call down to them, as my trailer (which is stored indoors 300 days out of the year) is only 3 years old and rusting in several areas.

cpatten
05-02-2011, 05:09 PM
Good luck with that, I hope you have better luck than I did!

11 Outback V
05-02-2011, 05:11 PM
I had several issues w my trailer that was only 3 months old. It was mainly in the finish. I was told in an e mail, that I still have, that they won't fix it because "its going to rust soon anyways". Not real happy w them and if I would have known then what I know now I would have bought a trailer from a different manufacturer.

deafgoose
05-02-2011, 05:16 PM
Mine is all rusted and its a 2008. Boooo!

mmandley
05-02-2011, 05:22 PM
Same issue, i have cracked paint, i have air bubbles in the paint thats not cracked and i have rust around some of the welds. I went the AWS and SC trying to get them to push on Boat Mate and no go.

Basically the only warranty you get with paint is if its chipping off when you buy the trailer.

Other then that parts are warrantied for 1 year but its Parts not labor. When i buy my next boat i will be much more aware of the trailer and what type i can get or will get.

sandm
05-02-2011, 05:44 PM
I thought the world of boatmate when I ordered my spare tire holder in the factory color for a song, but in replacing the step pads last weekend, I found the start of surface rust. called the dealer here. he told me that he was surprised that it wasn't worse. apparently the paint is the issue that they use and told me he sees it worse on newer trailers. basically an oh well moment. told me the only way to guarantee no rust is to buy a galvinized trailer. cousin has a dhm trailer under his tige and he has some of the same issues(although not quite as bad) so I'm not real upset at it. I guess if I would have paid 100k for an x25, I would not expect to see issues, but I certainly don't expect to have it remain perfect for years..

now having to pay labor rates on a product like a trailer within the first 2-3 years, especially considering the low mileage put on most trailers, that's a different story. should be 5year mechanical. heck, if kia can offer 100k warranty on it's parts..... :)

11 Outback V
05-02-2011, 06:05 PM
I have owned several, 10+, trailers and never had an issue like I do w BM. I have ordered custom trailers and kept them for 3+ years and used them in salt water w no issues.
If I would have known this before it would have been a lot different.
I have never, nor will I ,owned a galvinized trailer. This trailer was 6 years old when I sold the boat and was perfect w the exception of the wheels around the lugs from the salt. I had an issue w it after 2 years where it was starting to crack at a few of the welds. I called the builder, he fixed it and re powdercoated it. All for no charge.

http://i1238.photobucket.com/albums/ff482/shouldihaveone/IMG_0980.jpg


http://i1238.photobucket.com/albums/ff482/shouldihaveone/IMG_0979.jpg

http://i1238.photobucket.com/albums/ff482/shouldihaveone/IMG_0966.jpg

This trailer is all aluminum. Boat weighed 8200 lbs plus gear and fuel, 220 gallons. Was powdercoated, LED lights, electric brakes, electric jack, battery, storage box and swing rear drive gaurd.

you da man
05-02-2011, 06:08 PM
My front axle failed 9 months after purchase and replaced under warranty. Rear axle failed 5 months after warranty ran out but Boatmate covered it and sent me a new axle. I installed both axles so no labor...just a little over an hour of my time. However, on my first failed axle boatmate stated to me that IF I needed to tow my boat/trailer on a flatbed carrier that UPF who is the axle manufacturer would reimburse my fees. I didn't have to go that route and glad I didn't have to try to get my money back.

sandm
05-02-2011, 06:54 PM
outbackv, I think the primary difference is powdercoating. I tried to get some factory match paint from the local paint supplier. boatmate is using an odd type of dupont paint that is not "off the shelf". dealer told me they use a coating over it when done, think he said phosphorous to help protect it, but it's only paint. a pc trailer should last for years.
depending on the color(orange here), you will not be able to get a factory match touchup kit either. it requires several catalysts that are quite expensive. I was quoted in the $250-300 range for an exact match quart of the color and all the additives to get it to harden.

I think your success has to do with the key words "custom built". betting that trailer under your boat above was almost 1/4 the cost of your moomba otd :)
go back to that same builder and tell him you want a ski boat trailer, complete, brand new and otd for under 2.5k. bet it's just like what you are dealing with now if he will even touch it.

bergermaister
05-02-2011, 07:47 PM
Guess it's true that they don't make 'em like they used to...

Mine is a 2001 - after 10 years no rust except maybe on a minor chip or scratch. No problems with the axles, brakes, wiring, lights, anything... Has the original traction pads on the steps still, hell even the original tires.

What's up with the new trailers BoatMate??? I'd be absolutely pissed!

11 Outback V
05-02-2011, 07:49 PM
Sandm
I don't know who told you about the paint but I got a different story from BM. I had the repairs done locally at my expense and they were able to get the paint locally and it wasn't very expensive.
If the proper application and prep were done the paint should last. I don't see cars rusting in 3 months. Yes the car doesn't go underwater but then again my trailer was only in the water twice and has always been stored inside. I have a car that has never been kept inside and has no rust after 5 years??????
I will call the builder of my prior trailers and inquire about a price. I know he builds ski boat trailers

bslide
05-02-2011, 08:03 PM
Where are your axles breaking and is there any warning signs? We trailer our xlv about 100 miles everytime we go out.

cham
05-02-2011, 08:03 PM
Wow, $200 to hoist your boat? Ouch

For that much I would have found someone to let me tie off to their dock or spent the day on the water while it was fixed.

$200 buys a lot of fuel.

you da man
05-02-2011, 08:16 PM
Where are your axles breaking and is there any warning signs? We trailer our xlv about 100 miles everytime we go out.

When one of your wheels/tires tucks up into the fender you know your torsion axle has failed. It may rub the fender, it may not. One of mine did when it failed and it got so hot it scortched the paint on the fender and Boatmate sent me a new fender as well. Fortunately I'm only 2 miles from storage to ramp

http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u197/seeajgo/2.jpg
http://i168.photobucket.com/albums/u197/seeajgo/8.jpg

bzubke1
05-02-2011, 08:29 PM
3 of my calipers were rusted and sticking causing the trailer wheels to heat up so much that they would sizzle when going into the water. This was when they were 2.5 years old.

zabooda
05-02-2011, 09:36 PM
I repainted my trailer fenders after I got a bunch of rock chips and I got the Dupont paint locally and then added a hardener with it and it worked out well.

I do have to say that the look of the trailer almost turned me off from the sale. I bought the boat four years old and the boat was in great condition but the trailer had small rust spots all round and I noticed some were bright red and deep spots which indicated to me the trailer had been in salt water. I was buying from the Moomba dealer (no longer there) in Portland and it is conceivable though illogical that someone would trailer the boat to salt water so I assumed that it was continued exposure to moisture that made those few rust spots so pronounced.

Since getting the boat home, nothing has changed but those spots are touched up and where I live nothing rusts anyway. I guess I'm lucky in some sense as I got springs but I have those crappy drum brakes.

I saw a MC somewhere for sale with the TM trailer so they must use them with other brands also.

mmandley
05-02-2011, 10:17 PM
Todd, sick looking boat man lol.

How does the rear swing thing work? That looks pretty huge, do you wait till its almost in the water then unbolt it? Its pretty sweet none the less.

rdlangston13
05-02-2011, 10:49 PM
3 of my calipers were rusted and sticking causing the trailer wheels to heat up so much that they would sizzle when going into the water. This was when they were 2.5 years old.

Did you replace the calipers to fix this issue? I think my right front might be sticking. its considerable hotter to the touch than the other three

bzubke1
05-02-2011, 11:02 PM
I took it to a trailer repair place and he bored and honed the cylinders and a bunch of other stuff, now they work great. It might have been cheaper to get new caliper but I didnt wanna wait weeks to get the parts in.

501
05-03-2011, 01:19 AM
Would it help to add a Zinc Anode to the trailer to reduce rusting like they use on Boat Motors?

11 Outback V
05-03-2011, 05:17 AM
mike,
thanks,That trailer was set up pretty godd. The drive gaurd was pinned on both sides so you could remove it, but still had lights on the inner support. Yes, when you get to the ramp you took it off and put the props on. With props at 6000 ea and about 60 grand hanginig on the back the last thing you want is some silver haired devil hitting it!!!

sandm
05-03-2011, 08:39 AM
Sandm
I don't know who told you about the paint but I got a different story from BM. I had the repairs done locally at my expense and they were able to get the paint locally and it wasn't very expensive.
If the proper application and prep were done the paint should last. I don't see cars rusting in 3 months. Yes the car doesn't go underwater but then again my trailer was only in the water twice and has always been stored inside. I have a car that has never been kept inside and has no rust after 5 years??????
I will call the builder of my prior trailers and inquire about a price. I know he builds ski boat trailers


when I called the local paint jobber, they called dupont. my particular color(sunset orange) is a line of paint that require several catalyst agents to harden it. if you are a paintshop, no problem. average consumer looking to do some touchup, expensive problem. a quart of paint for around $50, but then between $2-250 for the hardeners and additives(something a paintshop will have laying around). they were able to compare colors and able to mix the paint in a similar line that did not require all the additives, but no one would guarantee color match since it's a different paint line. not saying all boatmate trailers are painted with this paint, but my color is.

not trying to defend or bash on boatmate trailers in any way, but imo, it's not a custom built trailer(like your other one, nor with a pricetag like that one), it's built assembly-line style for several dealers and the realistic fact is your trailer(just like mine) is the most basic trailer they make sitting under the most inexpensive boat from a "value line" brand. doesn't excuse quality and guessing yours is just a fluke, but I'm betting the problem will surface again by year 3. I'm not real happy about some of the things I see on my trailer, but I also know that I didn't buy an 80k skiboat. trailer companies are like car companies- there's escorts and navigators coming out of the same line.

It would be interesting to see what a custom trailer builder would charge compared to boatmate. betting they will be higher. granted better quality, but at a price. if they were able to offer the same powdercoated high quality trailer your elmo sat on for boatmate pricing, boatmate would be out of business and your builder would be running a large company making trailers for skiers choice :)

oh ya.. that boat is still real nice and betting it was a whole lotta different fun that what your current one does.. fast is fun..

11 Outback V
05-03-2011, 09:16 AM
That trailer under Elmo wasn't as expensive as people think. It has a lot of high dollar options that drove the price up ie electric jack, e o h brakes, storage box, battery aand drive guard. I paid 8 grand for that trailer but keep in mind the loa is 40 ft.
BM could build a better quality trailer if they just took a few more minutes in building it, that's based on the problems I had.
I would be fully willing to spend a little more money on a trailer that would last longer then 3 years. If in 3 years I have to spend 2 grand to get a new one why not spend a grand up front and never worry about it?

sandm
05-03-2011, 10:48 AM
totally agree with you, but when you are talking a 38k boat and a 88k boat, that extra grand usually means a higher payment for the 38k guy and since there's already a trailer there, it's tough to build a value case. kind of like trying to sell a 5year extended warranty on a maytag washer that has a 5year warranty already :)

having worked in a production warehouse for 11 years, sure they can build a better trailer, but there's a cost to it. production is all about leaning out a facility and at this point, no one is pushing them to incurr those costs for a better product. if skiers were giving customers a choice: product a for 3k and product b for 5k, the customer would decide, but alas, we don't have a choice readily available.

rdlangston13
05-03-2011, 03:38 PM
Well my trailer doesnt have much of a problem with rust except for some places where it is scratched. my main concern is having an axle fail on a road trip and i think i may have a possible brake caliper sticking

bzubke1
05-03-2011, 06:01 PM
Should the trailer wheels be warm to the touch after a drive with moderate braking, no mountain passes just some around town stuff? By warm I mean hot enough that you can warmth but cool enough that you can hold you're had on the wheel as long as you want.

evoimport6
05-03-2011, 06:43 PM
I am curious if anyone knows any preventative maintenance for this problem? I always grease the bearings but if there is anything else to be done I would love the info.

schuylski
05-03-2011, 10:25 PM
Wondering same thing - mine wheels are always fairly warm to the touch as well while traveling. And I noticed when I had the trailer wheels up off the ground, they do not spin freely - I can get them turning but there is some definite resistance. Anyone else have experience with that?

wolfeman131
05-03-2011, 11:18 PM
I put my trailer up on blocks for the summer while the boat stays on the lift and I can spin the wheels pretty easy. The rotors do get some surface rust while it's sitting, but it comes off quickly with a short pull and breaking down some hills.

sailing217
05-04-2011, 10:49 AM
I had good experience with BM. My hub seals were leaking 8 months after purchase. Replaced under warranty and my dealer either worked with them or ate the cost on labor. Trailered less than 1000 mi a year, always stored inside. I added 18" wheels and stainless fenders last year and it rides much better (tandem trailer). Just hit 5 years old and need carpet this year on the bunks.

bergermaister
05-04-2011, 11:48 AM
Do the newer trailers still have bearing buddies or are they a sealed unit? I have the buddies and only concern I've had is one of the hubs seems to be more hungry for grease than the others when I check them but doesn't appear to be leaking. I'm thinking it gets hotter and breaks it down faster.

rdlangston13
05-04-2011, 01:05 PM
Do the newer trailers still have bearing buddies or are they a sealed unit? I have the buddies and only concern I've had is one of the hubs seems to be more hungry for grease than the others when I check them but doesn't appear to be leaking. I'm thinking it gets hotter and breaks it down faster.

i have the vault "maintenance free" system. i have no clue how it works and that scares me

moombadaze
05-04-2011, 03:26 PM
i have the vault "maintenance free" system. i have no clue how it works and that scares me


Don't worry to much. Every time before you tow take a look at the inside and outside of the wheel and see if any oil has leaked out-it will leave a shiny trail down and puddle slightly on the rim lip-if no leak you should be good to go. If you see any, get the seals replaced pronto.

NCSUmoomba
05-06-2011, 03:48 PM
I am with berger on this one. My trailer is a 2001, and I have had zero trouble with it and it still looks excellent. Of the towboat trailers that I have seen, I still prefer Boatmate. I think the Mastercraft ones with the plastic fenders are crap. I am also not a big fan of the Nautique ones (Prestige?) I think Tige just switched to Boatmate. Malibu uses them too. It sounds like the torsion axles suck. I have the leaf springs, and I am guessing that berger has leaf springs as well.

bergermaister
05-06-2011, 03:52 PM
Yessir - Leaf Springs.

My buddy's Bu rides on an Extreme trailer, but I don't recall the suspension. He's had a few problems with the sealed hubs and bearings going out though and his is a 2009 if I remember.

rdlangston13
05-06-2011, 07:51 PM
well when i get home from work i am towing mine 180 miles to the lake and 180 miles back. keep your fingers crossed for me lol

bergermaister
05-06-2011, 07:58 PM
Well I for one will be having a Dos Equis on your behalf. Good luck man!

rdlangston13
05-06-2011, 08:00 PM
i might run it by the bass pro shop before i leave so they can check out the bearings and such, i have no idea how that vault is supposed to work

NCSUmoomba
05-09-2011, 01:49 PM
I have a theory about the torsion axles, or tandem axle trailers in general. I see a lot of people towing tandem trailers that are not level. Obviously, if a tandem axle trailer is being towed unlevel, then there will be more stress on one axle or the other. In the case of a torsion axle, it may "fail", or with a leaf spring axle, the spring may break. Either way, if one axle does fail, then most of the weight will shift onto the other axle, causing it to fail fairly quickly as well. This is assuming that with a tandem axle trailer, each axle is rated for about half of the weight of the load. If that is the case, then the idea of getting a tandem trailer that has an "extra" pair of wheels, "just in case" would not be very beneficial at all.

Also, I think with the tandem torsion axles, each axle is acting completely independent of each other, isn't it? With the tandem leaf springs, don't they share a common spring hanger between the axles? This might be better for weight transfer/distribution in case of a failure?

I also wonder about when trailering with a tandem axle trailer, what happens when the trailer is towed across an uneven surface or up a slope, like into a gas station. There would appear to be a moment when the load on one axle would be spike up pretty high, and the other axle load would dramatically decrease, while the axles travel over the surface. I know you guys have seen a tandem trailer before with one wheel off the ground. I wonder how many times the axles can withstand that spike in load before failing?

I don't really know, these are just some thoughts I had this weekend. I noticed my buddy's setup this weekend and it got my brain churning. He has a 2011 Tige RZ2 with a tandem Boatmate trailer that he tows with a F250 Powerstroke. I noticed that his trailer does not sit level with the boat on it. His rides higher in the rear, maybe 2 or 3 inches or so. I know some guys think this is better to keep the prop guard from bottoming out, but I disagree. I couldn't help but think about the extra stress on that front axle bouncing down the road at 60 mph.

I could be completely off base, but I wonder if there is any corelation between torsion axle failures on tandem trailers, and trailers being towed while not level? I also wonder how many single axle torsion axles have failed? Trailers should be level ya'll!

And as far as the finish on the trailers, I polish and wax my trailer every year with the same Mequiars products that I use on my boat, and I think it helps a lot. It is kind of a pain, but I think it is worth it.

What do you all think?

rdlangston13
05-09-2011, 01:59 PM
well maybe we need to find out who all has had a torsion axle failure and has pulled the boat level and who had a failure and had it leaning one direction or another. If I were a trailer builder I would design each axle with the capability of holding the entire load just in case a axle failure or a flat tire occurred. My tandem axle trailer leans slightly forward but that will be corrected once i get home and install my air bag leveling kit that i just purchased. Hopefully with that inflated i can tow the boat level with a truck bed full of gear.

bergermaister
05-09-2011, 02:28 PM
With the tandem leaf springs, don't they share a common spring hanger between the axles?

Yes - Mine has a shared spring hanger between the front and rear spring like an inverted T that pivots - lets the front and rear travel up and down independently if that make sense. I've never had an axle hanging in the air going up or down a steep driveway and there's been a few where I've scraped the belly of the trailer. I have seen utility trailers do that though but I'd bet they didn't share the pivoting hanger type setup.

I personally prefer a tandem - less weight per tire. If you ever were unfortunate enough to suffer a blowout you're not going to drop the whole trailer on it's side and start dragging. Imagine doing that at 60-70mph!

Plus I have always felt that a tandem just tracks straighter behind the truck with less sway.

100% agree about towing with the trailer sitting level. Same thing with travel trailers. Get a drop or raised hitch if you need to!

rdlangston13
05-09-2011, 05:47 PM
tandem axles also make it reverse straighter

rdlangston13
05-25-2011, 10:15 PM
so this last time i was out i noticed about all of the wood screw bolts that hold the bunks on the trailer are about half way out. When I tried to tighten them back in they just spun and would not bite, rotten wood im guessing.

Then when loading the boat back on the trailer i had to give it a little juice since the ramp is so slick i cant back the truck tires below the water line. This ripped out the staples on the back of one of the bunks. I bought some liquid rollers yesterday and plan on replacing and re-carpeting all the bunks as soon as i get home from work in two weeks.

What kind of wood or material do yall recommend for this? I was thinking pressure treated boards at home depot using bolts and nuts to secure the new bunks instead of those cheap screws. i figure if i put a bolt in from the top even if the nut falls off the bolt will prevent the bunk from sliding off the trailer.

mmandley
05-26-2011, 09:34 AM
Just make sure you counter sink them bolts on the top or the carpet wont last to long.

rdlangston13
05-26-2011, 10:50 AM
Just make sure you counter sink them bolts on the top or the carpet wont last to long.

yeah the plan is to use a router and go about 1 inch into the bunk so the bolt head will be down. then drill a hole into that hole, place the bolt in from the top, nut and washer on bottom. then add carpet adhesive and carpet, then stable the carpet to the bottom of the bunks

moombadaze
05-26-2011, 11:44 AM
David, think I remember your not supposed to wrap the carpet all the way under, something about letting it dry so the wood wont rot.

Last year I found I was missing a lag screw and about 1/2 were loose and some were allmost all the way out. I removed them all one by one and added liquid nails and reinstalled them all. Need to check them all soon before hauling long distance again

rdlangston13
05-26-2011, 01:41 PM
David, think I remember your not supposed to wrap the carpet all the way under, something about letting it dry so the wood wont rot.

Last year I found I was missing a lag screw and about 1/2 were loose and some were allmost all the way out. I removed them all one by one and added liquid nails and reinstalled them all. Need to check them all soon before hauling long distance again

that is interesting because i assume the ones on the trailer now were the factory ones and they are wrapper all the way around. its not a big deal for me to not enclose it, i can leave a 2 inch slip or so on the bottom for the water to drain and allow air for drying.

i was told about some kind of plastic sythentic wood you can use that never rots but i dont remember what it was called and did not see anything like that at home depot

pprior
02-09-2013, 01:42 AM
Don't worry to much. Every time before you tow take a look at the inside and outside of the wheel and see if any oil has leaked out-it will leave a shiny trail down and puddle slightly on the rim lip-if no leak you should be good to go. If you see any, get the seals replaced pronto.

Old thread, I know, but this is good advice.

I had smoking pouring out of one of my axles this summer, rim was glowing a bit (had no idea towing it, just smelled it when I got home) Had to replace the axle. Boat is 2009, no help from boatmate. Was into it $1000 all said and done.

I have since read of a lot of failures on these sealed boatmate bearings. I'm not a fan, but it's what I have at this point. If you do see any shiny stuff coming out, I would highly recommend you get it looked at. They also have some special fancy grease and you can't use anything else. It can take days to get it.