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Gottop69
05-23-2011, 04:57 PM
Well I want to say hi I am new to this site...

This weekend went out and bought a 2009 Moomba Mobius LSV.. I was torn between this and a 07 Malibu 23 footer.. I bought this Cause I liked all it came with.. I felt good when the dealer took me and the wife out on the water this weekend to learn the boat.. I am a little worried about pulling people but I was told this is a good boat to start or even finish with.. I think I will start small with tubing.. Then move up to Wakeboarding.. Any suggestions on thing to watch on the boat or things to do while learning..

Thanks in advance..Here are a few pics

mmandley
05-23-2011, 05:06 PM
Welcome to the forum and nice looking boat.

The LSV is a beast of a pulling boat so my main advise is get used to the throttle resonce. Also get used to the way it handles when driving slow such as when picking up your riders if your not used to driving a V drive boat.

As for when you pull people with a rope for the first couple times be very easy on the throttle, every one who has driven my boat and never driven a V drive nearly pulls your arms off and they punch that throttle like the boat has a V6 in it.


Other then that have fun and keep her wet.

Gottop69
05-23-2011, 05:21 PM
Thanks man.. My daughter is excited.. We spent 2 hours with the dealer learning the boat saturday

moombadaze
05-23-2011, 05:51 PM
Congrats on the new boat.

If your new to boating try a boating safety course.

DOCDRS
05-23-2011, 06:06 PM
Nice colours , like the powder coated tower n cans

JesseC
05-23-2011, 06:29 PM
I second the suggestion on the boating safety course. I have been boating my entire life and took a safety course about 3-4 years ago and picked up a few things I had not thought of.

Also, always pay attention to your dropped rider, It is your responsibility to get the boat between the rider and any oncoming traffic/danger! I have had to do a few power turns to get my rider safely shielded behind the boat. I am not saying do a power turn every time, but your riders safety and those aboard are your top priority, boats can be fixed!!

Keep the water as smooth as possible for other riders, no power turns unless necessary, do not tube in a slew or "glassy water" area, go out where the water is less smooth and tube there.

And lastly, keep an eye out for your own rope!!! That should be self explanatory!!

KSmith
05-23-2011, 06:50 PM
Welcome and that is a great lookin boat you got there!

sandm
05-23-2011, 07:02 PM
love the pc tower. green is nice looking. not a color you see on the lake everyday..

enjoy the new purchase and stop back often. wealth of knowledge on here and hopefully just added one more regular member of the skiers choice family here :)

Moseley618
05-23-2011, 08:39 PM
Beautiful boat! I love the green. I started with a V-drive last year and the best advice I can give is watch the loading and docks. The rear of the boat will move to the right when in reverse and you have no steering in reverse other than the planned right movement. The boat only turns when the boat is in gear so go really slow and just bump the throttle to make small correction when coming into a dock or slip or loading the boat. Do not be afraid to pull wake boarders, it is simple. Have fun!

BensonWdby
05-23-2011, 09:29 PM
Congrats- That is a lot of boat to take on for your first boat.
1. Boats do not have brakes. Approach things slowly.
2. Do not be afraid to coast in neutral. you will spend a lot of time bumping the throttle from forward-neutral-forward-neutral-reverse-neutral, etc...
3. Practice backing up out in the middle of the lake because these boats only back up one way, and it is not straight back
4. Get a boat bump/fender with a two foot line on the end. When you are driving around - and it is safe/not busy - throw the fender out of the boat. Then go get it - do not leave your seat to pick it up. Pull up without hitting, without slipping past it, and keeping it alwasy in your sight. Come to a stop before you try to pick it up. Once you can do that then you might be ready to pull someone.
5. In general do not spend a lot of time trying to go backwards. You will just run over your rope.
6. NEVER pick up your skier on the passenger side of the boat. Always approach the skier keeping them in full sight.
7. When people are at the back of the boat - shut off the engine.
8. Have fun.

davinci
05-23-2011, 09:34 PM
Hey Gottop welcome and gongrats on a fine purchase, you're going to love this forum...heck I put my boat together thanks to this forum.

Sea N' Things
05-23-2011, 09:55 PM
Congrats on the new boat. You made the right choice on the LSV vs Malibu. Welcome to the Mooomba family :)

Gottop69
05-24-2011, 09:19 AM
I wanna say thanks for all the help so far.. I have been doing a ton of reading on boat saftey and forums like this to learn some does and dont's.. You guys rock..

Also after a few good weekends of trying to learn the boat I will be on asking some dumb questions.. So sorry in advance for that.. LOL.. I joind this site not only cause the boat I bought but it seems like the members are down to earth and enjoy helping each other.. It is a good group from what I have read so far..

Gottop69
05-24-2011, 09:24 AM
Congrats- That is a lot of boat to take on for your first boat.
1. Boats do not have brakes. Approach things slowly.
2. Do not be afraid to coast in neutral. you will spend a lot of time bumping the throttle from forward-neutral-forward-neutral-reverse-neutral, etc...
3. Practice backing up out in the middle of the lake because these boats only back up one way, and it is not straight back
4. Get a boat bump/fender with a two foot line on the end. When you are driving around - and it is safe/not busy - throw the fender out of the boat. Then go get it - do not leave your seat to pick it up. Pull up without hitting, without slipping past it, and keeping it alwasy in your sight. Come to a stop before you try to pick it up. Once you can do that then you might be ready to pull someone.
5. In general do not spend a lot of time trying to go backwards. You will just run over your rope.
6. NEVER pick up your skier on the passenger side of the boat. Always approach the skier keeping them in full sight.
7. When people are at the back of the boat - shut off the engine.
8. Have fun.

This is great info and I picked up those bumpers saturday.. So I will try this for sure.. I bought this boat cause my 13 year old wanted to go to the lake.. So nothing more important to me then the safety of everyone onboard the boat.. I have been on boats a lot and drove this is my first to own.. But it is a diffrent feel driving this v-drive.. Like a mix of a sports car and get up and go of a motorcycle... So I want to say thanks I will do this this weekend.. Safety is #1 in my book.. I can buy cars boats any day cant replace familey and friends do to my stupidity...

pmoomba
05-24-2011, 10:10 AM
A few things to think of when you start pulling a rider.

- Of course get familiar with the boat, handling, acceleration, etc all without anyone in the water first. Get familiar with perfectpass or the cruise if your boat has it, do some practice run at different speed settings. If you don't have it no problem, just get used to the boat and keeping a constant speed.

- Come up with the hand signals you're going to use and make sure all the riders know them so they're comfortable. What I like to use are thumbs up - faster. Thumbs down - faster. Hand straight out like a stop sign - faster. Hand making a 'cut' motion across then neck - faster.

- Ideally, get an experienced rider/friend who has skied/wakeboarded/whatever before, for the first time out. In addition to being able to give you some tips/instruction, they will be able to handle less than perfect attempts and be experienced enough to know if they need to bail/let go earlier. If you don't have anyone that's ok, but you'll definitely want to err on the side of slower than faster.

- If you, and no passenger has ever skied or wakeboarded (or doing whatever is is you're going to do), look up online how to do it and how to teach someone to do it. Youtube has videos on everything under the sun, just watch a few "learn how to waterski" or "learn how to wakeboard" type videos and get comfortable. If you're taking kids/friends/etc they will appreciate the instruction/direction on how to get up correctly and not get as frustrated if it's not working right away. May as well get your 13yo watching videos for whatever he/she wants to do, they might be already.

- Once you're ready to go, the rider can put on the board/ski on platform (or in the water). They can either bring the rope with them when they jump in, or you can toss it after they have the ski/board on if you're not going to blow too far away from them. Of course do this while stopped with the engine off. Always be conscious of the rope and its position. Check before you go, when you are picking up the rider, when they are finished, etc. I know people have run over ropes before but I never understood how; I always know where it is and how to avoid it.

- When the rider is settled in and has the rope, you want to use a combination of idle and just coasting in neutral to tighten the rope and get them directly behind the boat. Once they're behind and stable just idle forward. If they're fighting their balance, fighting for the rope, or otherwise look uncomfortable just go back to neutral (or even reverse just to stop the boat) until things settle down, then back to idle.

- Once they are ready they'll need to let you know. Everybody has a go word, "Hit-it", or "Go", or whatever. Some don't like Go because it sounds like No, but there's no reason to say No, just don't say anything at all. What I like to do is let them know that when I, the driver, am ready, I'll yell back "whenever you are ready". This lets me make sure the rope is correctly taught, they are lined up ok, the water in front of me is clear, etc. I let them know that once I yell back, I'm listening only for them to yell Go or Hit it or whatever.

- When it's go time, you need to give it some throttle. With that kind of boat though you won't need to slam it. You did some practice runs earlier and got a good feel for the throttle/acceleration. If it's a wakeboard, and the person knows what they're doing you'll barely need any throttle at all. They have a lot of surface area and don't need a lot of speed to get on top of the water. If it's two skis, you might need a little more. Slalom needs the most but you can still err on too slow and give it more gas as you get familiar. How much you need will also depend on the rider. A 13 yo is going to need a lot less than a bigger adult.

- If it's an inexperienced rider start on the slower end of speed once they finally get up. Wakeboarding, 15-18 mph depending on how comfortable they look, how much they weigh, etc. Two skis anywhere from roughly 23 (inexperienced light person), 25ish (inexperienced a little heavier) to 28-30. Slalom start out around 27-28, more experienced will go up from there. More experienced might wakeboard from 21-24mph, two skis 29-31, slalom 28-32 (real good skiiers to 34-36+ but they'll tell you if they want to go that fast).

- When they fall, as was already mentioned a softer turn is to just let of the gas, come to a stop, do a slow turn around and head back. This is easy to do and also prevents huge waves going around the lake. As mentioned always keep the fallen rider on the drivers side, and err on being too far away from them. Let them swim for the rope (or toss it again if necessary). When you're more experienced you can bring the rope almost right to them, but start easy.

- If they didn't get up, try to correct what they did wrong, or let them know it was because you gave them too much or too little throttle (which happens too) and keep them interested in giving it another shot. This is easier if you're experienced yourself of course. You generally just want one person giving the direction to avoid the too many chefs problem.

- Make sure the rider knows to just let go as soon as they are uncomfortable or close to falling if they're new. Some people want to hold on too long which leads to harder falls and potentially injuries. As they get experienced they'll know what they can hold on through, but it's always fine to just let go early and start over. Same thing with the boat really. If someone is cutting across you, or you're not sure you can turn away from something safely with the rider behind you, or whatever, just stop. The rider will coast and sink into the water but no harm done.

- Actually driving with someone behind the boat requires some awareness too. Eg, things like if they ever get slack in the rope and aren't experienced in handling it, gently turn the boat away from them to more softly tighten up the rope vs. them getting a big yank when it catches up itself. Be aware of other boats, wakes, turning with a person behind you, etc.

Have fun!

Gottop69
05-24-2011, 10:33 AM
A few things to think of when you start pulling a rider.

- Of course get familiar with the boat, handling, acceleration, etc all without anyone in the water first. Get familiar with perfectpass or the cruise if your boat has it, do some practice run at different speed settings. If you don't have it no problem, just get used to the boat and keeping a constant speed.

- Come up with the hand signals you're going to use and make sure all the riders know them so they're comfortable. What I like to use are thumbs up - faster. Thumbs down - faster. Hand straight out like a stop sign - faster. Hand making a 'cut' motion across then neck - faster.

- Ideally, get an experienced rider/friend who has skied/wakeboarded/whatever before, for the first time out. In addition to being able to give you some tips/instruction, they will be able to handle less than perfect attempts and be experienced enough to know if they need to bail/let go earlier. If you don't have anyone that's ok, but you'll definitely want to err on the side of slower than faster.

- If you, and no passenger has ever skied or wakeboarded (or doing whatever is is you're going to do), look up online how to do it and how to teach someone to do it. Youtube has videos on everything under the sun, just watch a few "learn how to waterski" or "learn how to wakeboard" type videos and get comfortable. If you're taking kids/friends/etc they will appreciate the instruction/direction on how to get up correctly and not get as frustrated if it's not working right away. May as well get your 13yo watching videos for whatever he/she wants to do, they might be already.

- Once you're ready to go, the rider can put on the board/ski on platform (or in the water). They can either bring the rope with them when they jump in, or you can toss it after they have the ski/board on if you're not going to blow too far away from them. Of course do this while stopped with the engine off. Always be conscious of the rope and its position. Check before you go, when you are picking up the rider, when they are finished, etc. I know people have run over ropes before but I never understood how; I always know where it is and how to avoid it.

- When the rider is settled in and has the rope, you want to use a combination of idle and just coasting in neutral to tighten the rope and get them directly behind the boat. Once they're behind and stable just idle forward. If they're fighting their balance, fighting for the rope, or otherwise look uncomfortable just go back to neutral (or even reverse just to stop the boat) until things settle down, then back to idle.

- Once they are ready they'll need to let you know. Everybody has a go word, "Hit-it", or "Go", or whatever. Some don't like Go because it sounds like No, but there's no reason to say No, just don't say anything at all. What I like to do is let them know that when I, the driver, am ready, I'll yell back "whenever you are ready". This lets me make sure the rope is correctly taught, they are lined up ok, the water in front of me is clear, etc. I let them know that once I yell back, I'm listening only for them to yell Go or Hit it or whatever.

- When it's go time, you need to give it some throttle. With that kind of boat though you won't need to slam it. You did some practice runs earlier and got a good feel for the throttle/acceleration. If it's a wakeboard, and the person knows what they're doing you'll barely need any throttle at all. They have a lot of surface area and don't need a lot of speed to get on top of the water. If it's two skis, you might need a little more. Slalom needs the most but you can still err on too slow and give it more gas as you get familiar. How much you need will also depend on the rider. A 13 yo is going to need a lot less than a bigger adult.

- If it's an inexperienced rider start on the slower end of speed once they finally get up. Wakeboarding, 15-18 mph depending on how comfortable they look, how much they weigh, etc. Two skis anywhere from roughly 23 (inexperienced light person), 25ish (inexperienced a little heavier) to 28-30. Slalom start out around 27-28, more experienced will go up from there. More experienced might wakeboard from 21-24mph, two skis 29-31, slalom 28-32 (real good skiiers to 34-36+ but they'll tell you if they want to go that fast).

- When they fall, as was already mentioned a softer turn is to just let of the gas, come to a stop, do a slow turn around and head back. This is easy to do and also prevents huge waves going around the lake. As mentioned always keep the fallen rider on the drivers side, and err on being too far away from them. Let them swim for the rope (or toss it again if necessary). When you're more experienced you can bring the rope almost right to them, but start easy.

- If they didn't get up, try to correct what they did wrong, or let them know it was because you gave them too much or too little throttle (which happens too) and keep them interested in giving it another shot. This is easier if you're experienced yourself of course. You generally just want one person giving the direction to avoid the too many chefs problem.

- Make sure the rider knows to just let go as soon as they are uncomfortable or close to falling if they're new. Some people want to hold on too long which leads to harder falls and potentially injuries. As they get experienced they'll know what they can hold on through, but it's always fine to just let go early and start over. Same thing with the boat really. If someone is cutting across you, or you're not sure you can turn away from something safely with the rider behind you, or whatever, just stop. The rider will coast and sink into the water but no harm done.

- Actually driving with someone behind the boat requires some awareness too. Eg, things like if they ever get slack in the rope and aren't experienced in handling it, gently turn the boat away from them to more softly tighten up the rope vs. them getting a big yank when it catches up itself. Be aware of other boats, wakes, turning with a person behind you, etc.

Have fun!

Lots of good info thank you..

kaneboats
05-24-2011, 11:46 AM
Excellent advice above. Don't be scared. Be vigilant and careful. Have a plan for what you are going to do. Yes, these boats only back up to the right. Approach a dock at a 45 degree angle coming in from the left, then reverse and back the right rear right over to it. Lots of practice will make you more confident but practice is fun! Love the green! Enjoy and welcome!

Gottop69
05-24-2011, 11:53 AM
Excellent advice above. Don't be scared. Be vigilant and careful. Have a plan for what you are going to do. Yes, these boats only back up to the right. Approach a dock at a 45 degree angle coming in from the left, then reverse and back the right rear right over to it. Lots of practice will make you more confident but practice is fun! Love the green! Enjoy and welcome!

Thank you.. I for once can't wait to learn..

mmandley
05-24-2011, 11:57 AM
We bought our boat two years ago and i came up with a game thats fun for all while learning and it really helped people to learn how to drive the boat.

We call it Wake Boarder down, all you need it a rubber football.

What you do is get the boat cruising at like 15 to 20 and have someone else randomly throw that football out of the boat, then holler Wake Boarder down!!!


Then the drivers goal is to slow the boat down turn around and go get the ball. The trick is pulling up close enough for someone to reach out and grab it. If your not close enough they cant reach it because its small. If your too fast the boats wake will push it away from you.

This teach many things all at once. Get people used to holler rider down, teaches driver how to slow, turn and approach a down rider and how to control the boat at slow speeds.

We had every one that wanted to drive the boat play this game for at least a couple throws and now we have 4 regulars that are all solid drivers.

Gottop69
05-24-2011, 12:00 PM
That is a awesome idea.. Thanks

spoon03
05-24-2011, 12:55 PM
that's a helluva first boat...have fun

Gottop69
05-24-2011, 03:26 PM
that's a helluva first boat...have fun


lol I don't do anything half a$$.. LOL

csm
05-24-2011, 04:06 PM
I don't usually like powdercoated towers, but yours looks awesome. love the black/green color combo.

Lots of good advice above. After some practice, driving a v-drive becomes second nature, and you'll never want any other kind.

Best advice I can give is to assume that every other boater on the lake is drunk and/or an idiot. And get a mic for your tower speakers so you can yell at jet skiers that are jumping your wake while you're pulling one of your kids.

Gottop69
05-24-2011, 04:45 PM
I don't usually like powdercoated towers, but yours looks awesome. love the black/green color combo.

Lots of good advice above. After some practice, driving a v-drive becomes second nature, and you'll never want any other kind.

Best advice I can give is to assume that every other boater on the lake is drunk and/or an idiot. And get a mic for your tower speakers so you can yell at jet skiers that are jumping your wake while you're pulling one of your kids.

Thank you.. Yeah the dealer told me the same thing about the mic.. My wife said hell no cause I will be yelling at hot chicks to show me stuff... LOL I ordered one..

rdlangston13
05-24-2011, 04:58 PM
My girl friend always yells at me because i use my tower mic to yell at fishermen.

Probably the best advice you are going to get on this board...come to the Texas Moomba Owners jam out on bethy creek in riverside in July. You will get a chance to meet other moomba owners and will probably learn alot while having a blast

Gottop69
05-24-2011, 05:41 PM
My girl friend always yells at me because i use my tower mic to yell at fishermen.

Probably the best advice you are going to get on this board...come to the Texas Moomba Owners jam out on bethy creek in riverside in July. You will get a chance to meet other moomba owners and will probably learn alot while having a blast

Heck yeah I will be at shcliterbahn for a week in july... ( or how ever you spell it )

jpetty3023
05-24-2011, 06:26 PM
Great looking boat brotha. I just bought a new 09 LSV back in April and absolutely love it. While this wasn't the first boat I owned it was my first "pro-comp" wake boat as I like to call it. This site has been great and everyone has been very helpful and Quick to lend a helping post!! I've already had my 20 hour service done and this weekend the ballast will get filled and the family will start surfing.

Ive come in a little hard a couple of times on the dock but have quickly learned slow is the best way to approach. Take your time and enjoy being on the water Grab you a box of magic erasers and those smudge marks will wipe right off!!

Enjoy your time creating moomba memories with the family.

Gottop69
05-25-2011, 09:35 AM
thanks man.. I look forward to learning this weekend..

sailing217
05-25-2011, 10:32 AM
If jet skis or boats are following your rider, shut down and power back to sheild your rider. If too much traffic, just chill out. Kids get mad, but I can relax. We also chillax if the launch ramp is too busy, give it 20 minutes and it calms down usually.

Practice trailering when the ramps are empty. Don't leave your boat at the dock in the launch lane. Tie on the outside or putter around the lake and pick up the trailer parker.

Like everyone says, backing up the boat and docking takes practice. HA, I had to abort docking my first time out this year. My fellow boaters were laughing at me as I've boated all my life, but knew sometimes you gotta shake the Rust off.

Drain Plug, have a spare ready at all times. If your bilge goes on just after launching, check it first thing. I have a launching checklist in my head.

Gottop69
05-25-2011, 11:34 AM
If jet skis or boats are following your rider, shut down and power back to sheild your rider. If too much traffic, just chill out. Kids get mad, but I can relax. We also chillax if the launch ramp is too busy, give it 20 minutes and it calms down usually.

Practice trailering when the ramps are empty. Don't leave your boat at the dock in the launch lane. Tie on the outside or putter around the lake and pick up the trailer parker.

Like everyone says, backing up the boat and docking takes practice. HA, I had to abort docking my first time out this year. My fellow boaters were laughing at me as I've boated all my life, but knew sometimes you gotta shake the Rust off.

Drain Plug, have a spare ready at all times. If your bilge goes on just after launching, check it first thing. I have a launching checklist in my head.

What are good drain plugs to keep... Also If you don't mind can you share your launching check list.. I have one that the dealer showed me at the lake But I want more opinions or ways others do it

rdlangston13
05-25-2011, 12:29 PM
1) Turn on the breaker to power my accessories, plug in IPod, jam music while prep continues
2) Install bilge plug
3) Remove transom straps
4) Check fire extinguisher pressure
5) Install SXT65 tower speakers
6) Verify I have enough life jackets for those on board + 1 or 2 extras
7) Load boards on Z5
8) Connect ballast bags
9) Ice the beer in the cooler (this should really be step one or two)

Once in the launch
1) Unplug trailer lights
2) Back boat into water
3) Start blower followed by the engine
4) check for any leaks in engine compartment and for normal gauge readings
5) Turn engine off, check oil in engine
6) Restart engine and disconnect boat from trailer winch
7) Back off and have a blast

sandm
05-25-2011, 12:34 PM
if you lose your drainplug somehow(hope it never happens) the little foam floatey thing you get on your keychain can be squished and shoved into the drain hole to get you back to the ramp :)

skiyaker
05-25-2011, 01:40 PM
if you lose your drainplug somehow(hope it never happens) the little foam floatey thing you get on your keychain can be squished and shoved into the drain hole to get you back to the ramp :)

that and remember that if you go fast enough it will suck water out of the boat

sandm
05-25-2011, 03:10 PM
only until you stop to get the trailer ;)

Gottop69
05-26-2011, 08:58 AM
lol spair plug check.. I pick the boat up today at 12pm wish me luck

mmandley
05-26-2011, 10:04 AM
lol spair plug check.. I pick the boat up today at 12pm wish me luck

If you can even sleep LOL. Good luck it will be a blast.

Heres out launch checklist i go over.

Beer and beverages are iced before we leave house.
Oil and trans fluids checked before we leave house.
Check balast system is all pluged in
Check batteries are charged up

At launch prep area.

Remove rear transom straps only.
Have buddy get in boat and get things ready, ie open center windshield to see and hear better from the truck, hand wake boards in the racks.
ignition on check voltage and other gauges work properly.

Then i back the boat down the ramp, i dont unplug my lights only due to there water proof and i dont want my brakes engaging due to no power on the switch.

Once i see the back of the boat float up off the trailer a little i stop the truck.
Buddy starts the boat, then watches oil pressure gauge for pressure.
I then release the front strap on the nose of the boat and give him a shove while he applys the reverse gently.

Once hes clear of the trailer i part truck and trailer.

While boat driver waits for truck and trailer he put board up in Z5 rack and lets the boat idle to make sure everything is running normal.

When the day is over i get droped off at the dock to get truck/trailer. Crew gets off, i only like 1 or 2 people in the boat when trailering, i want the boat drafting as shallow as possible. Driver hit all drains and lets the ballast drain out.

Back the trailer all the way down the ramp and soak all the bunks then pull it out till just the top of the trailer fenders are out of the water.

Have boat driver come in from a good distance back slow < dead slow > did i mention slow?

I have them focus on the back of the truck center window or the something centered and this helps get the boat centered.

As soon as the nose passes threw the guide poles boat goes into nuetral and then i let the trailer slow the boat and center it.

This is the most important thing, take it slow, to fast you can damage the trailer and the boat and if you try to float with no momentum you have no steering. Also be very very carefull about using reverse this close to the trailer the boat will try to turn side ways and T bone the trailer.

Once the boat is on the trailer from the drive on i hook the strap to it and crank it will the driver applys just enough throttle to pull the boat up. Pull the boat all the way till the D ring hits and is resting on that back side of the nose roller. Other wise the boat will bounce while being towed and can cause a lot of damage to the boat and trailer.

Turn off Engine before you get pulled out of the water.

Once the boat is on the trailer, and your ready to pull off the ramp, take it really slow as you come out of the water. There will be a lot of extra weight on the truck from the boat being in the water and the ramp slope. Once at the clean up area we wipe the entire boat down, put all the gear away and lastly add the rear transom straps.

This is what i have found to be a very important step. Once the boat is on the trailer shut the engine off. Now open the engine bay door to let it air cool.

I do this because there is a ton of heat in that area and with the water it builds mildew very fast. Plus just like your car engine when you shut it off it will actualy heat up more. I leave the engine bay door open while we clean the boat and prep for leaving the lake. Once prep is done we close it all up and roll out.

Most important thing is remove the transom straps only before launch. Reinstall those transom straps after your done for the day. Never roll the boat down the ramp with no nose strap in place as the boat can slide off the trailer. Never trailer the boat down the road with no transom straps as a large enough bump or dip can make the boat move in the trailer or fly right off.

Gottop69
05-26-2011, 10:16 AM
Good advise.. I was thinking I needed the transome straps

mmandley
05-26-2011, 10:19 AM
One of the very best upgrades you can do for your trailer.

http://www.overtons.com/modperl/product/details.cgi?i=80594&pdesc=Overtons_Retractable_Transom_Tie_Down_System&aID=603J&merchID=4006

http://www.overtons.com/modperl/product/details.cgi?i=73278&pdesc=BoatBuckle_G2_Bow_Tie_Down_System&aID=603J&merchID=4006

I did these both last year and it makes all the difference in the world when preping and peace of mind knowing your baby is locked down to that trailer.

Gottop69
05-26-2011, 10:38 AM
LOL owned a boat about a week now.. pick it up today.. I have hade Overtons saved for the past 3 months I was looking at boats.. Love that site

rdlangston13
05-26-2011, 11:42 AM
you are very trusting when it comes to letting someone drive you boat mike! i do it the opposite, buddy goes and gets the truck and trailer and I driver the boat onto the trailer lol

Gottop69
05-26-2011, 03:30 PM
OK got it home.. Now just 2 nights of sleep then lake here we come... I also got a surf board from boat shop.. They say its easier and fun to learn a lot about the boat for driver and surfer... any thoughts..

cab13367
05-26-2011, 03:45 PM
OK got it home.. Now just 2 nights of sleep then lake here we come... I also got a surf board from boat shop.. They say its easier and fun to learn a lot about the boat for driver and surfer... any thoughts..

I would not recommend trying to surf until you have a really good handle on driving. First of all, you will fill only one side of your rear ballast so your boat will be leaning heavily on one side which makes turning it more difficult. Secondly, you will only be working with about 15' of rope which means you have to get closer to your rider. So a hard to control boat driven by an inexperienced driver needing to get close to a rider equals potential for disaster.

cab13367
05-26-2011, 03:59 PM
Wow, some of you guys have some pretty extensive pre-luanch rituals! This is what I do:

1. Arrive at boat launch and go to pre-launch prep area. Load coolers and backpacks, etc. in the boat, unhook transom straps, load boards onto the racks, have everyone get in the boat, put life jackets on the kids.

2. When everyone is seated, proceed to the ramp and back it in. I tell my boat driver (my son) to turn on the blower.

3. I stop backing up when I know that the raw water intake is in the water. I get out, tell my son to start it up as I undo the winch strap.

4. I check to make sure the water is clear behind the boat and get back in the truck and slowly continue backing in. My son will put it in reverse as I am backing in and as soon as the boat floats of the trailer I pull forward to park the rig. He idles away until he is clear of the loading area and waits for me.

5. Once I park the rig, I run down to the boat dock. My son noses in slowly, I step into the bow as he puts it in reverse and away we go.

When it's time to go, I have him drop me off at the boat dock (same process, nose in slowly, I step off as he puts in in reverse). He idels away from the loading area and waits until I have backed the trailer in then drives the boat onto the trailer. Don't tie up or hold the boat on the dock while waiting for the trailer to get backed in.

I check the oil in the garage before we leave. No reason to do it at the ramp. I check the tranny and v-drive fluids every few outings. There is no oil in my bilge so I know it's not leaking any so I don't check the fluid levels all the time.

Al

Gottop69
05-26-2011, 04:32 PM
I would not recommend trying to surf until you have a really good handle on driving. First of all, you will fill only one side of your rear ballast so your boat will be leaning heavily on one side which makes turning it more difficult. Secondly, you will only be working with about 15' of rope which means you have to get closer to your rider. So a hard to control boat driven by an inexperienced driver needing to get close to a rider equals potential for disaster.

i will have a guy that has been boating for years with me he will drive for that process.. Also the dealer filled the ballist while we test drove it so I could feel it on each side and totaly full.. It is way diffrent.. I wont do anything to hurt my riders if at all possible

mmandley
05-26-2011, 05:07 PM
you are very trusting when it comes to letting someone drive you boat mike! i do it the opposite, buddy goes and gets the truck and trailer and I driver the boat onto the trailer lol

Only 3 people are allowed to drive the boat on the trailer, me, Claudia and my good buddy Steve.

Claudia cant back the truck and trailer down the ramp, but she can park the truck and trailer. I let Steve drive the boat on the trailer most of the time as he knows exactly what i want done and there actualy more risk of the truck and trailer being damaged in the parking lot backing it up and driving to the ramp.

Its a give and take thing. If i could id do it all myself but thats rude to all the toehr users of the boat ramp.

@Al we pretty much do the same things as you when launching and loading but we are multitasking, i stay on the ground and Steve is in the boat and we get everything done prety fast.

This year i think i will most likley launch a little closer to your style as fare as useing the truck to shove the boat off the trailer.

rdlangston13
05-26-2011, 06:10 PM
i let my buddy cody drive my boat and my dad drive my boat. thats about it lol. maybe one day the g/f will be able to get behind the wheel...

Ian Brantford
05-26-2011, 06:23 PM
Here is my boat ramp checklist. You can print this out, snip it down with scissors, and keep copies in your pocket, truck glovebox, boat storage and your alternate driver's pocket. Yes, I really used this at the launch for years. Just don't let the use of it slow you down to the point where it's ticking off other users of the ramp.

LOADING
=======

Position boat at dock
Back trailer into water
Place wheel blocks
Cut boat engine
Let winch out
Position boat on trailer
Balance boat side-to-side
Crank winch in
Attach bow chain
Remove wheel blocks
Clear launch
Attach rear tie-downs
Connect lights
Remove bilge plug
Transfer gear from boat
Attach safety chains
Latch hitch





LAUNCHING
=========

Turn bilge blower on
Inspect launch
Transfer gear
Remove rear tie-downs
PUT BILGE PLUG IN
Disconnect lights
Prepare dock lines
Fuel -- check/fill
PUT BILGE PLUG IN
Remove bow chain
Back trailer into water
Place wheel blocks
Let winch out; disconnect
Position boat at dock
Turn bilge blower off
Start engine
Remove wheel blocks
Park trailer
Wear PFD's

After switching from an I/O to an inboard, I was glad to be able to remove items regarding tilting the drive unit up and down. Also, in reality I leave the bilge plug in almost all the time. The XLV's hull is so deep in the middle that you have to tilt it ridiculously high to get out more water than the pump will get. Plus, the marina kept losing my wheel blocks, so now I just depend on my truck's oddly strong parking brake.

I disconnect the lights to put the trailer in the water. Sure they are sealed when new. I just don't want to short them out on that day when a seal fails.

cab13367
05-26-2011, 06:46 PM
Oops! Forgot to mention the plug. I put that in before we leave the house and then check it again at the prep area.

rdlangston13
05-26-2011, 06:49 PM
i guess it is a good safety precaution to you chaulk blocks but i think that is a little unnecessary. Parking brake and putting the truck in park are all i have ever done.

c.rix
05-26-2011, 07:15 PM
Oops! Forgot to mention the plug. I put that in before we leave the house and then check it again at the prep area.

Its actually illegal in Minnesota to tow your boat with the plug in even if you did put it in at home my buddy got a ticket last year for it

cab13367
05-26-2011, 07:36 PM
Its actually illegal in Minnesota to tow your boat with the plug in even if you did put it in at home my buddy got a ticket last year for it

Now why would that be?? That's a new one on me.

wolfeman131
05-26-2011, 10:17 PM
I'm guessing it's to help prevent transfer of "stuff" from one lake to another via water in the bilge.

Ian Brantford
05-27-2011, 12:52 AM
I'm guessing it's to help prevent transfer of "stuff" from one lake to another via water in the bilge.

It would also be a precaution to take in case of sudden, heavy rainfall when towing with no cover. I tow with no cover, but also only in fair weather when possible. Preparing for when I was pressed into towing when rain was imminent was one time that I did remove the plug for towing.

mmandley
05-27-2011, 09:33 AM
Yall got me there. I think the plug in my boat has only been removed once or twice in the 2 year ive had it lol.

Ive removed it and still water in the bilge, ive driven up steep hills and all the way home, still water in it. So i said F it ill just leave it in all the time lol.

When i get home i just dry the bilge area out and im done.

moombadaze
05-27-2011, 09:37 AM
I tow with the plug out and have had the bilge pump kick on when I've got cought in a summer shower before I got the Evolution's towing cover

mmandley
05-27-2011, 09:41 AM
I hear ya Stacy, i know i should prolly tow without it and maybe this year ill attempt to try that, i need to get a couple replacements first cause i have a bad feeling id forget it or lose it..

jbheuerman
05-27-2011, 10:03 AM
I'm with you mmandley. I've never removed the plug in the 3 yrs I've had my boat. Kind of a pain, especially since it doesn't drain anything. Even on a steep incline, hardly any water gets to the drain plug. Major flaw in Moomba's design. Hopefully when I get a new one, the center drain plug will fix it!

Gottop69
05-27-2011, 10:36 AM
I have a stupid question.. The bigle pump is auto right..

I ask because I was packing the boat turned on the radio and the bilge started pumping water out.. The switch did not turn it off.. Reading manual it says it is auto and manual. Just making sure this is normal..

kaneboats
05-27-2011, 10:45 AM
It's auto and manual. It's on a float switch so it will come on when the water level in the bilge is high enough. It's also manual so you can turn it on yourself if you see or hear water or if the float switch gets sticky and it doesn't come on. If you can turn it on with the radio switch you may have to check whether the manual wires are plugged on the correct terminals.

Gottop69
05-27-2011, 11:12 AM
It's auto and manual. It's on a float switch so it will come on when the water level in the bilge is high enough. It's also manual so you can turn it on yourself if you see or hear water or if the float switch gets sticky and it doesn't come on. If you can turn it on with the radio switch you may have to check whether the manual wires are plugged on the correct terminals.

Yeah I'm a idiot.. I went out and let it finish puming it shut off.. then I checked the manual switch.. It was outside the night before I picked it up and we had a bunch of rain that night.. So the bilge area was full.. I just got worried.. Sorry and thanks..

Gottop69
05-31-2011, 09:20 AM
OK took it out 2 days this weekend.. We had a blast.. Picking up people got real easy even on a very windy lake.. I only have one complant this only right turn in reverse is hard to get use to.. But I think another few weekends I will get it down.. Docing my first couple of times was a little hard.. One of those things I think practice practice practice... But the mariana gets upset if you do that here may need to find another way...

Also there was the loading on the trailer first day not so good.. Came in good then bam its kicking to the side.. Second day better started to go to the side and then I put it in reverse and it did better..

Well time to clean it and let it air out.. Any ideas on how to practice this stuff???

Thanks in advanced..

Ian Brantford
05-31-2011, 10:14 AM
Well time to clean it and let it air out.. Any ideas on how to practice this stuff???


Congrats on your first weekend with... no property damage. :-)

For practice, on a calm day you can drop a fender into open water, drive away then then come back. Approach it so that you stop with the fender right beside the boat's swim platform.

When you are at the real dock or trailer, a sure-footed passenger should be ready with a boat hook pole. This can be used to push or pull the boat sideways to correct for minor mistakes, or to brace it in windy conditions. One thing that might not be obvious when hooking (to pull) is that it is often easier to hook a ring from underneath. I buy telescoping paddles that are made to double as boat hook poles -- it's makes for less gear to bring and stow.

Examples: http://www.nextag.com/telescoping-boat-hook/stores-html

Gottop69
05-31-2011, 10:40 AM
That makes a lot more since..

mmandley
05-31-2011, 11:51 AM
only way to get better at trailering is do it. Id say goto the doc on a weekday in the evening at 6pm or later, most will be off the lake. Then back the boat off drive away and then come back to trailer.

This way if others show up you can move let them trailer and then go back to your practise session.

As for docking the boat it will take practise but master the Bump technique.

Bumping is drive forward, then put it in nuetral, then in reverse just long enough to feel the engine engage the trans, then back to nuetral. Then go forward again.

This bumping is how you control slow speed moves and it acts as a brake without turning the boat side ways.

Other wise when docking head to it at 30 to 45 degrees around 1 or 2 mph. As the nose is about 5ft away put it in reverse enough to feel the boat slow and it will pull the rear of the boat right up to the dock.

Once you get the hang of this poeple watching will be pretty impressed how the boat pulls right up.

I have a habit of when people are ridding and they say there done i will swimg the swim platform right up to them and shut off the engine and they dont have to swim to the boat.

kaneboats
05-31-2011, 11:53 AM
I do that too. With a down rider I pull up on the driver's side and then reverse the platform right to them.

Gottop69
05-31-2011, 12:18 PM
I may go out during the week and practice that less people out there..

rdlangston13
05-31-2011, 05:14 PM
im going to get my girl friend started on some of these training exercises soon i think. she needs to be able to pull me when we dont have a third or when the third is my 13 year old sister

Gottop69
06-01-2011, 09:44 AM
Yeah me and the wife are gonna go out and practice this.. I hate that I have to try and unload the boat go move the truck then get back on the boat.. Pain in the a$$

rdlangston13
06-01-2011, 11:11 AM
Yeah me and the wife are gonna go out and practice this.. I hate that I have to try and unload the boat go move the truck then get back on the boat.. Pain in the a$$

it totally trust my gf pulling the trailer forward with no boat. she wont even try to back it up so that is not even an issue lol

JesseC
06-01-2011, 11:19 AM
Just come up with a way to launch and recover that keeps the wife comfortable. Here is how we launch and recover the boat.


Launch:
We pull up at the marina and I jump out and put the plug in the boat and connect the lines to the bow and stern to hold the boat against the dock.

I then back the boat down the ramp and stop when the fenders go below the water. The wife then moves into the turcks driver's seat and I get the boat unloaded and up against the dock. She pull the trailer out FORWARDS and parks the truck/trailer in the parking lot.

Recovery:
The wife stays with the boat that is usually tied up to the dock and I head for the truck. I back the trailer down the ramp and stop just as the fenders go under the water. The wife then moves to the truck and I load the boat onto the trailer and winch it up tight. She then pulls the trailer and boat FORWARDS to get us off of the ramp and out of the way.

If you can keep the wifes involvment to only pulling forwards she may show more interest in learning to do more.

mmandley
06-01-2011, 11:49 AM
Ours works a lot like this too Jesse when i dont have anyone i trust with the boat.

Claudia is getting more comfortable driving the boat on the trailer now but if we have any cross winds forget it lol.

She is real comfortable driving the truck as long as its forward LOL.

Gottop69
06-01-2011, 02:30 PM
Just come up with a way to launch and recover that keeps the wife comfortable. Here is how we launch and recover the boat.


Launch:
We pull up at the marina and I jump out and put the plug in the boat and connect the lines to the bow and stern to hold the boat against the dock.

I then back the boat down the ramp and stop when the fenders go below the water. The wife then moves into the turcks driver's seat and I get the boat unloaded and up against the dock. She pull the trailer out FORWARDS and parks the truck/trailer in the parking lot.

Recovery:
The wife stays with the boat that is usually tied up to the dock and I head for the truck. I back the trailer down the ramp and stop just as the fenders go under the water. The wife then moves to the truck and I load the boat onto the trailer and winch it up tight. She then pulls the trailer and boat FORWARDS to get us off of the ramp and out of the way.

If you can keep the wifes involvment to only pulling forwards she may show more interest in learning to do more.

I really like this idea