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spoon03
06-15-2011, 09:47 AM
On my turns both toeside and heelside, sometimes I get water splashed up in my face coming out of the turn before I cross the wake. It's a little annoying. I have adjusted my boots back a little to try and prevent it. I'm sure it's my technique. Is it a boot adjustment, weight adjustment, wheelie turn??? Not a real big deal, but I would like to improve on it.

maxpower220
06-15-2011, 06:01 PM
Is this slalom skiing? toe/heel side is a wakeboard term. onside and offside. If skiing, it is probably your technique. You should research and find the factory settings for your ski and bindings. Set your bindings there and then go from there. Most likely, you are too far back on the ski.

spoon03
06-15-2011, 10:37 PM
Yes, it is slalom. You are correct, don't know what I was thinking when I wrote the post. Just dazed I guess.
I had the ski at factory settings when I was having the problem, then I tried moving it back. I will try moving it forward if you think I am too far back on the ski.

skiyaker
06-15-2011, 11:13 PM
Are you getting slack when this happens? What speed and rope length are you skiing at? I'm just trying to picture what is happening. I've found it invaluable to have somebody record my skiing- I'll bet if you did that you could identify a difference in technique between the times when you get water in your face and when you don't. You could even post it on youtube and get some really good advise from some of our expert skiers (not me).

Be careful about moving the bindings around too much- I moved my bindings forward last year to correct what really was a technique problem and paid for it with a OTF fall and sprained ankle that still hurts me today.

spoon03
06-16-2011, 10:42 AM
Are you getting slack when this happens? What speed and rope length are you skiing at? I'm just trying to picture what is happening. I've found it invaluable to have somebody record my skiing- I'll bet if you did that you could identify a difference in technique between the times when you get water in your face and when you don't. You could even post it on youtube and get some really good advise from some of our expert skiers (not me).

Be careful about moving the bindings around too much- I moved my bindings forward last year to correct what really was a technique problem and paid for it with a OTF fall and sprained ankle that still hurts me today.


I ski at 31 mph at 15 off. I have been working at 22 off, but my boat has a fairly large wake at that length. I get some slack on my offside turn occasionally. I haven't really videoed myself, but I need to. I am not that great of a skier, but I am constantly striving to improve. I have a decent onside turn, but my offside needs some work, and the water in my face is distracting when I'm crossing the wake. On the OBV, I need all of the focus I can on wake crossing because of the size of the wake. I figure that if I can master the OBV, then a direct drive will be extremely easy.

iwaterskihard
06-16-2011, 01:58 PM
How big and heavy are you? What kind of ski are you riding?

spoon03
06-16-2011, 04:31 PM
I am 6'2", 195 lbs. I have a Connelly FX 69" with Stoker Double bindings.

maxpower220
06-16-2011, 09:03 PM
If you ever make down to Tampa, give me a call and we can work on it behind my Outback.

Mikey
06-16-2011, 11:09 PM
As someone mentioned ,if you ever have the chance to video tape some skiing you will probably be able to tell what you are doing wrong fairly easily or you can get a coach or Pro look at and tell you what you are doing.

In this day and age its quite simple even if you just use a simple camera and video it . I went down to Florida and had Chris Parrish as a personal coach for a couple days and we discussed a couple issues i was to work on. I sent video by email and he replied with some giggles first then simple advice to help correct me. There are lots of ways to go about this but just seeing it yourself may be all you need.

As for making adjustments ,usually they are not warrented and should be done in only the slightest incriments only.Also write down or remember the stock settings so you have something to go back to. Most skis are set up to suit the masses and unless you really know what you are doing is it really worth it?

BensonWdby
06-17-2011, 12:40 AM
I used to think I was qualified to give advice - but no longer. I strongly suggest getting a lesson from a qualified slalom instructor. I just started doing this in the last couple of years - after 35 years of skiing from home videos and magazines. That all helped but nothing compared to skiing with someone who knows what they are talking about. I wish I had taken lessons 30 years ago.

If you can't get to a lesson, I strongly recommend Andy Mapple videos. He made two with Gordon Rathbun at Ski Paradise. The first is pretty techincal for serious course skiers. The second is what I would recommend for you:
http://www.bartswatersports.com/catalog/Water_Ski_Videos/Andy_Mapple_at_Ski_Paradise_DVD_MS31883/index.asp

As I write this I am wrapping up a 6 day shot with Doug Meeker at The Liquid Edge, finishing with a hard set coached by Wade Cox. Overall great experience. Coaching in general is a great way to vaoid developing bad habits (that stick with you for decades). Just like golf - even the Pros use a coach or get lessons.

I would recommend putting your bindings back to factory settings. Correct form will not splash you in the face unless maybe a strong headwind.

Good luck - it will get better with practice.
Dave

iwaterskihard
06-19-2011, 01:30 AM
I have to agree that form or technique is what's happening or giving you that splash?

As the others said - get some video of yourself and if you're close enough some coaching? I know I'm in for a couple hours of upcoming coaching too.

If you haven't started taking your ski apart to adjust this and tweek that - I wouldn't do it!

Watch some good guys ski, there's lots of videos out there! And if you're like me and can't get away to ski school for a whole week - just go to a ski school and take a couple hours of instruction! You'll be glad you did! :p

zabooda
06-19-2011, 04:46 AM
I would recommend more speed coming out of the turns and the easiest way is a faster boat speed. It sounds like you have a neutral stance which is a good thing. A faster boat speed does two things: 1) Reduces the boat wake size 2) Shoots the spray from the ski further behind you. Give it a try and see if it makes any difference.

spoon03
06-19-2011, 10:58 AM
I would recommend more speed coming out of the turns and the easiest way is a faster boat speed. It sounds like you have a neutral stance which is a good thing. A faster boat speed does two things: 1) Reduces the boat wake size 2) Shoots the spray from the ski further behind you. Give it a try and see if it makes any difference.

What speed do you recommend going up to? 33-34? Thanks for the advice. I am going to put the ski back at factory settings, and bump up a mile or 2 per hour and see how that works. I'll also get some video.

moombabound
06-19-2011, 01:19 PM
Sounds like you're back on the ski.
That results in the angle of the ski to the water being more vertical vs horizontal, which causes the water to be thrown forward instead of to the side. You are skiing into that spray.
The boot position adjustment you made will make it worse.
Check the wing angle setting on the fin. If it's set aggresive, it will adversely impact you by driving the back of the ski down, when you are already doing that too much. Take out most of the angle, or remove the wing completely, and see if there's a diff.
Get it on video. Doesn't have to be a 1/2 hour video. Even inexpensive digital cameras have a video mode. Have someone take a clip of your onside and offside turns. You'll see.
Don't speed up the boat to compensate for technique.

zabooda
06-20-2011, 02:25 AM
Spoon, with you weight and ski length the 33-34 speed should be correct.

Matt Glenn
06-22-2011, 04:05 PM
It sounds like you are tail riding ( ie you are leaning back on your ski) So moveving your bindings back will make it worse. Put binding back to stock and then take your ski to pro shop to check out your fin. Most of the time it is your skiing. When you think you are blanced on your ski your not , when you think you are set up and have a good edge/ lean across the wake you don't. I could not agree more with the video taping. When it comes to to much slack on your turn try moving your center of gravity over your front foot / leaning forward after the sec wake in order to slow the ski down and hit the turn. When it comes to the speed of the boat , if not skiing the cousre the faster the boat and the shorter the line the faster things happen and harder to correct mistakes. I would stick with 15 off and no more then 32. Yes the faster the boat is going the better the wake , but if you are on edge right and whipping accross the wake you can ride behind a wakeboard boat without a problem. Just my two cents !

BensonWdby
06-22-2011, 07:31 PM
Regarding slack - usually happens when you lean back over the tail and force the ski around. I used to do this so bad I would hit the rope with the ski as I finished the turn. Fortunately that was a long time ago. Another symptom is where your hands are. If you find yourself wanting to pull the rope up by your chest or face - probably leaning back. This is also an attempt at slack management.

Skis are designed to turn - so let them. I have been skiing for 40 years and thought I understood this long ago, but only in the last couple years have I really figured this out - thanks to coaching.

Inliner
06-24-2011, 08:00 AM
I agree with the technique discussion. Many times people think it is equipment when in reality it is something they are doing wrong. Get a video camera and video your sets. It will pay dividends in self-diagnosis. Don't change things on your ski until you are sure it is an equipment issue. It will only take you backwards if you aren't careful. I use a Sony DCR-SX40 equipped with a device called a "hoodman" on the LCD screen so you can see it in daylight. I mount it on a monopod and if they ride in my boat they shoot. I would venture a guess and say that what you are feeling is being caused by a flat ski and the wind. You may need to lean more but the video will tell you the real story. Also that will give others something to diagnose.

spoon03
06-25-2011, 11:39 AM
I know my technique is not that great, but having the equipment set up correctly is imperative. I agree with you all, that it is technique. If mine was really good, I would be giving you all advice and skiing in world class tournaments. I will video when I get a chance to ski again and hopefully put it on you tube so you all can watch, and hopefully pick it apart and give constructive criticism. Thanks to all the input. I have learned a lot from that little question I posted.

Also, I just wanted to say. This is what this forum is all about. Boating and water activities and giving advice. The past week was sad to see after I had received so much good information from this site. I don't always post, but I read a lot to gather information. I had not responded to all of that nonsense until now, but I hope EVERYONE, drops their egos and let's get back to helping eachother.

zabooda
07-04-2011, 02:38 AM
Let us know what worked for you.