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View Full Version : Some coaching on backing Moombas



millerda68
09-12-2011, 07:07 PM
I am sure 90% of this is just me and being newer to this type of boat (my previous boats have been outboards or I/O's).

Reverse in the Moomba seems weak and very hard to steer reliably. It lacks power and does not maneuver as well as outboards or I/O's. We have been in a couple pinches this year where the inability to reverse well has been an issue. We had once instance with the river current this summer that reverse wasn't strong enough, and I have had one instance at Hagg with the wind blowing and launch area full of boats where it was a bit stressful navigating out of.

99% of the time we can launch, I can spin the boat and drive straight out of the launch. The wife and I have a pretty good system down for the launch and pick up and we are in and out in a heartbeat. The couple of instances mentioned above, I had passengers on board, so everyone could take a corner of the boat and make sure we did not bump any other boats, etc. Just created a lot of stress for the driver and not wanting to ding up my boat or someone else's.

How do the long time owners handle reverse and steering?

maxpower220
09-12-2011, 07:46 PM
As your prop is located in front of your rudder, it works great in forward with power on the prop. However, all other situations require planning and practice. In reverse, the prop doesn't pull enough water across the rudder to have any effect on the boat. So all you get is backing. However, the prop pulls water from the side, which causes the boat to move to one side (the right in our case). This is called squawt (same things as P-factor in a plane). Knowing that the rear always moves right in reverse, you plan to use that to manuever the boat.
The keys are: practice, patience, and practice.

rdlangston13
09-12-2011, 07:58 PM
exactly what max power said. once you know it only goes back and to the right then you just plan your maneuvers around that. i have never had an issue backing

wolfeman131
09-12-2011, 08:08 PM
Not much more to add other than don't be afraid to abandon what you're doing and simply start again. You can practice turning the wheel and bumping the throttle in/out of forward/reverse so that you "spin" the boat 360 degrees.

you da man
09-12-2011, 09:04 PM
Not much more to add other than don't be afraid to abandon what you're doing and simply start again. You can practice turning the wheel and bumping the throttle in/out of forward/reverse so that you "spin" the boat 360 degrees.

Agreed, you can spin a v-drive with practice in a very tight spot. I was very confident in tight quarters with my 23' XLV. Oh, you can reverse to the left...just need more speed in reverse but the delay is longer than reversing to the right.

skiyaker
09-12-2011, 09:05 PM
coming from and I/O the first time we took our moomba out I wondered what kind of mistake we had made- getting an inboard instead of an I/O. Now I can spin my boat in ways that I never could with an I/O

#1) practice spinning on axis
#2) always plan ahead- never put yourself in a position where you need to move the rear toward port. The times I've gotten in trouble is when I had an obstacle in front of me, wind blowing the rear of the boat toward shore on the starboard side
#3) have a paddle handy- I keep one of those telescoping orange paddles under the driver seat- it takes up minimal space but can be a prop saver if you get in a pinch. If above happens shut the engine down and push off. You can also use the handle end to push off of the dock or other boats

Have fun!

walb0244
09-12-2011, 09:17 PM
I thought this when I first got mine. I am getting alittle bit better with it but still. Once you learn the reverse you can start using it to your advantage. Just like when you go up to the dock you can bump it in reverse and fish tail the boat up to the dock. I know some guys on here fish tail the entire boat around and have people step on and off the back swim platform onto the dock. I'm not to that point yet. I have had a few times that I was worried.

When I was down in Missouri the boat ramp was way back in a cove. Well the dock was on the left side and the wind was blowing into the cove really bad. When I pulled off the trailer and got past the trailer poles the boat started turning with the back end going to the right. Well with the wind blowing once the boat got sideways it started pushing the entire boat toward the boat ramp. I was really worried. Between going in reverse and hammering the throttle in forward I was albe to get the boat away from the ramp. But I was worried.

Can someone explain this spinning on axix?

kaneboats
09-12-2011, 09:24 PM
You are just alternating between fwd and rev to turn the boat in a counterclockwise direction without really moving other than spinning.

lsvboombox
09-12-2011, 09:56 PM
Can someone explain this spinning on axix?

Technical term is called a "back and fill" you use prop walk to your advantage. Your stern walks to starboard in reverse so in forward u can turn to port .. u can literally do circles all day long.

bergermaister
09-12-2011, 11:42 PM
I will crank the wheel and burp the throttle fwd to spin the boat, then quickly into reverse to spin and aim the direction I want when backing up. Thought at first that I looked like a doof doing it until I got complimented on my "handling skills" one time at a launch that is pretty tight with a nasty current. I don't like it but have learned to live with it... Just gotta make sure everyone is seated when you're doing that sort of maneuvering.

AZJC17
09-13-2011, 09:40 AM
Good info everyone, I'll tuck these tips in my back pocket for sure.

LakePerson1952
09-13-2011, 12:12 PM
As others have said, the key is practice - but practice away from other boats and docks - with wind/current and without - practice all situations you can think of and do it BEFORE you find yourself in that situation. Some people put out bouys or milk jugs to simulate docks or other obstructions and boat slip corners. This is my first inboard runabout but I have a history of inboard cruisers too (single and twin screw) and have always backed my boats into slips for docking. Once you get used to it, you will probably begin to think you have more control than when you had an I/O.

Backing up, you can go straight or even when desired to one side or the other by mostly being in reverse and "bumping" forward with the wheel cranked to the appropriate side to kick the stern over the way you want it to go or to counter the "natrual" direction in reverse. To back into a slip, you would generally need to plan for wind by initially aligning up-wind a bit from where you untimatly want to be to allow for the drift - more wind = more drift.

Your boat should be able to counteract any wind or current when in reverse (I've seen boats actually pull a skier when in reverse) - you very well may need to bump in forward to straighten or counter act drift.

Rotate in place by turning the wheel the way you want to turn and then start your turn by bumping forward and then reversing to counter act the forward motion - back and forth - no need to change the wheel when in reverse. You shouldn't have any problem rotating left or right.

I have actually found that I do have some minimal steering control in reverse.

Another thing to keep in mind is that when going very slow forward, if you've turned the wheel even slightly before going into neutral you will continue the turn even if you straighten the wheel and it is easy to have overcompensated before you put it in forward again (in other words, steering when in neutral is not great either even if you're going forward). Concentrate on stablizing your turn before slipping into neutral.

This wasn't asked and I assume everyone knows this but it never hurts ... if you're going forward and someone falls overboard, you must turn toward them to kick your stern away from the person in the water.

sicktc06
09-13-2011, 03:46 PM
This is for a different brand boat, but this helps explain the fish tailing aspect.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Px6AkkKHb4&feature=related

mmandley
09-14-2011, 07:05 AM
Miller i frequent Hagg a lot, prolly more then anyone other then possibly Al but i think we are even at worst lol. First never launch off the ramp with docks on both sides ( larger one ) this is the worst ramp for our boats and the couple times i have seen your trailer there this was the ramp you were at and i was forced at as it was a busy day. Second you have to if your not already be in the habit of docking tot he drivers side all the time. Not just some times but All the time as this is the only side you have any control in.

Secondly if there is a bunch of boats in the ramp when your launching then your just goign to have to have a nose spoter or know how to turn on a dime literaly.

This is easiest done as others have said but my own experience is turn the wheel all the way to left, then forward enough to feel the boat move, then you go reverse the same and go back forward to rotates the boat to the right going forward and pulls it to the left in reverse and it will rotate the boat in a very small circle.

As for docking you aim the hand rail on the nose of the boat at the dock. Then apx 4ft before the dock put the boat in reverse, at first it acts as a break and as you add more reverse it will pull the rear of the boat up to the dock. Its late in the season now but these are fundamentals that you have to learn and once you do people will be amazed how the boat docks and how easy you make it look.

I have a lot of I/O people with me that dont understand how V drives work when steering but once i talk them threw it and show them how i have control they agree its so much better then an I/O

sicktc06
09-14-2011, 11:55 AM
Second you have to if your not already be in the habit of docking tot he drivers side all the time. Not just some times but All the time as this is the only side you have any control in.

I cannot say I agree with this statement. I can dock my boat on the left side. It takes time to learn, and a wee bit more patience to get it docked on the left side, but it's certainly do-able.

kaneboats
09-14-2011, 12:24 PM
Not me, I just spin around and dock it right sided backward.

lsvboombox
09-14-2011, 02:29 PM
I dock port side just about all the time... if someone doesnt have enough control to dock a boat on either side please stay away from my boat.....

cab13367
09-14-2011, 04:54 PM
I have a lot of I/O people with me that dont understand how V drives work when steering but once i talk them threw it and show them how i have control they agree its so much better then an I/O

Sorry Mike, I don't agree with this at all. I had an I/O for 15 years before I got my Moomba and my I/O was much more maneuverable at slow speeds, and it can back up to port or to starboard.

mmandley
09-14-2011, 07:59 PM
@sictc06 Im not saying you shouldnt know how to dock it both ways what im saying is you should be able to always approach the dock on the drivers side, if you cant then you cant wait a few minutes or dock the swim deck up. You can dock it with the passenger side of the boat but you cant tell me its easier because i drive the boat and dock it all the time and the only control you have is driving it to the dock, once you slow down you have no steering and reverse only pulls the nose closer to the dock and requires someone to grab the dock and turn the boat for you.

@lsvboombox same statement as above. Also i agree if you cant control your boat stay away from mine.

@Al yes Al and I/O can back up to startboard but i my experience most of the I/O people i know are all the people i goto LBC with and they would rather spin the boat and drive out normal then back the boat out of the dock area. I personaly have drivin the I/O and sure they have control at slow speeds but have a huge turning radius and this in its self makes me not like them due to id rather be able to spin my boat and drive forward. I dont like backing the boat up in the water due to inherent dangers of people standing in my way, and idk something about the prop being the first thing to collide with something.

Like i said these are my thoughts and i respect you thoughts.

KSmith
09-15-2011, 01:41 PM
I have owned both I/O and Inboard. Each seems to have advantages and disadvantages depending on the situation one finds themselves in. I used to sneak the I/O into wicked narrow channels or coves knowing I coud back out. Can't do that with the inboard, but I do like being able to spin the boat when needed which the inboard is great for. There have been times at the dock the inboard was teh best tool for the job given the placements of the boats, wind, dock, current. There have been times I'd wished I had teh I/O to get out of a situation that arose when other boats crowded the dock/lauch area and had no understanding the backing capabilities of an inboard. Either boat can find itself in a situation the other may be better, but you have to work with what is at hand so knowing the capabilities and limitations of the boat is necessary. I am probably going to get a pole with a hook on it for next season, it can come in handy in dicey situations...

My wife was wicked nervous about driving the inboard in docking and retreival situations (and rightly so, she rammed the trailer twice the first time we were taking the boat out, thank God we were alone at the launch...), anyway, we used some boat fenders and a throwable float to make an obstacle course for her to navigate thru for practice. Worked pretty well but there are still times pinheads at the dock/launch get in her way or make her nervous, best choice for her then is she will pull out and wait for the traffic to clear until she feels better about the situation. No need to force it in if the situation is ugly

sicktc06
09-15-2011, 04:14 PM
@sictc06 Im not saying you shouldnt know how to dock it both ways what im saying is you should be able to always approach the dock on the drivers side, if you cant then you cant wait a few minutes or dock the swim deck up. You can dock it with the passenger side of the boat but you cant tell me its easier because i drive the boat and dock it all the time and the only control you have is driving it to the dock, once you slow down you have no steering and reverse only pulls the nose closer to the dock and requires someone to grab the dock and turn the boat for you.

No worries my friend, I wasn't bashing at all. It's not exactly "simple" to dock on the passenger side, expecially when learning, but once you get the hang of how the boat will drift and how to correct it, it gets just as easy as driver side. Although, yes it does take a few extra moments to get to the dock. I kind of did what ksmith did at a dock until I learned how to get it right.

wolfeman131
09-15-2011, 06:35 PM
I am probably going to get a pole with a hook on it for next season

we have one and have it at the ready every time we pull into the lift or up to a dock.

bergermaister
09-15-2011, 06:52 PM
I bought an extendable pole with a hook when I first got the boat. Used it maybe once in the last 5 years? It now resides in the shed next to the old slalom skis, anchors, and fishing gear.