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trebor-75
10-19-2011, 02:16 PM
First off, I have a confession to make... I dont own a Moomba. Im actually a 17 year old senior in high-school. But my dad does have a moomba, and since Im the one who found the boat and am in charge of all its upgrades and such, I have the account. And Im not going to lie, its become a bit of an addiction. Hope you guys dont mind.

Anyways, being a senior, Ive started thinking more about my future lately. Im fairly sure that Ill going into mechanical engineering and I cant think of anything Id rather do than design wakeboats. I cant count how many times Ive been told to find a job I truly enjoy, and I know that would be it.

However, Ive been doing some research and Im really not finding anything. Is it just one of those having to know the right people things? How would you go about getting started? Is this even a realistic goal? Any thoughts, input or advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

pmoomba
10-19-2011, 02:52 PM
Over at ballofspray.com (forums seem somewhat busted at the moment) there's an ongoing thread by a naval architecture student, wanting to design a better slalom boat. You might try sending him a message to get a perspective from someone a little closer to the field.

http://ballofspray.vanillaforums.com/discussion/2538/ski-boat-design-ideas/p1

chawk610
10-19-2011, 03:42 PM
I joined this forum well before I bought my Mobius... I think anyone that has something to share or add is a welcomed member. Besides... you kinda own one indirectly. Can't help with the college thing... but glad to hear young folks still aspire to worthwhile goals! Good luck,

mnpracing
10-19-2011, 04:15 PM
Hey, that's my previous boat, literally! Sounds like you are enjoying it.

kaneboats
10-19-2011, 05:23 PM
Study up on the meaning of "internship". That's one path to doing what you want to do.

ryan_8099
10-19-2011, 05:30 PM
Study up on the meaning of "internship". That's one path to doing what you want to do.
Echo on that, just graduated college a few months ago with 4 internships. They got me further "in the real world" than any college class (although I still needed the degree) did. Try to get information from companies you would be interested in. The worst they say is "No, we don't hire interns" You might not hear back or get no useful information from 9-10 places, but you only need one :)

You will be a Moomba owner sooner than you think, just bought half of one just before my 22nd birthday. :D

rdlangston13
10-19-2011, 07:29 PM
i think getting a job in the wakeboat field as an engineer would be kind of hard but an awesome accomplishment. This is just such a small total industry that I dont see them recuiting alot of new engineers.

You could always go oilfield, we are always hiring engineers haha

LakePerson1952
10-20-2011, 02:48 PM
....
Anyways, being a senior, Ive started thinking more about my future lately. Im fairly sure that Ill going into mechanical engineering and I cant think of anything Id rather do than design wakeboats. I cant count how many times Ive been told to find a job I truly enjoy, and I know that would be it.

However, Ive been doing some research and Im really not finding anything. Is it just one of those having to know the right people things? How would you go about getting started? Is this even a realistic goal? Any thoughts, input or advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!

If you go to www.skierschoice.com they have the following note:

Employment Opportunities
The Skierís Choice manufacturing facility is located in Maryville, Tennessee in the Blount County Industrial Park. For employment opportunities visit the company or contact our office at the number shown below. Skierís Choice is an equal opportunity employer

Voice 865.983.9924


I don't know if a visit is an option for you but I'd be surprised that if you called there wouldn't be someone in Human Resources who could give you some info - and maybe hook you up with one of the actual engineers for a chat. Other boat companies would probably do the same and some of them might even have an online careers or employment link. Colleges with appropriate degree programs could help too - would it be mechanical engineering or naval architecture?

The BEST of luck to you - I'm an electrical engineer (mostly high tech electronics and software) and after 30 years in the field I still get up every morning looking forward to going to work.

kaneboats
10-20-2011, 03:57 PM
Shoot, looks like you even have a reference now.

rc5695
10-21-2011, 01:12 PM
ditto on finding what you love doing, and also, even more so on the intership. That can make a huge difference! It has gotten me a long ways! I'm now 36, and also enjoy my job. I'm not a mechical engineer, but a mechanical designer. I use NX software for CAD (solid modeling & making drawings) and CAM (writing CNC programs from my models at my computer), and also get to do some CNC programming (controlling a milling machine or lathe by computer instead of hand). I do some manual machining too and love it. I didn't get my bachelors, but have an associates. I'm now almost peaked out, and see myself unfortunately having to go back to school in the next couple years :(

Anyways, call some manufacturers (Malibu, Nautique, MC, etc.) and talk to engineers or HR and inquire about jobs, interships, and where they do hire their engineerrs from (what schools have good programs for that). The only one I see lots of advertisements looking for engineering type jobs is Mercury Marine. They are almost always hiring, in FL and WI usually. Try not to limit yourself too awful much at first; i'd recommend focusing more on getting your foot into the industry at first than making sure you can get into the exact company you think you want to work for at this time. Don't get me wrong, try with where you want first, but don't get too hung up on it if things dn't work out is all I'm saying.

Oh, and who cares if you're 17. Just don't post a bunch of immature stuff like a 7 year old and it's all good ;) Welcome to the forums.

trebor-75
10-25-2011, 02:09 PM
Thanks for all the advice! I will look into seeing if I can get a hold of any of these companies and ask how they hire engineers and what they look for in them. And the internship thing makes a lot of sense, too.


"Colleges with appropriate degree programs could help too - would it be mechanical engineering or naval architecture?"
I was thinking about that too, and naval architecture is probably best for hull design, but Im assuming they would need engineers from many fields to work on a whole boat. Plus, with a degree in mechanical engineering it gives me many more options to fall back on since that field is so broad.

"Try not to limit yourself too awful much at first; i'd recommend focusing more on getting your foot into the industry at first than making sure you can get into the exact company you think you want to work for at this time. Don't get me wrong, try with where you want first, but don't get too hung up on it if things dn't work out is all I'm saying."
I never really thought of that, but it definitely makes sense.