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ChrisK
12-26-2012, 11:19 AM
What's everyone's opinions?

I'm moving into a new house at the end of January that has a nice big garage, that is unfortunately NOT heated. So, I'll be running a natural gas line to the garage and then installing a heater. I really don't want to spend a whole lot of money on the project but I want something that will last and keep the place warm. What style do you all recommend, any install advice, etc?

There's a nice infrared heater that I can purchase through my company for really cheap but I think the shop ceiling is too low for one of those (9 or 10 foot ceilings, something like that).

wolfeman131
12-26-2012, 12:11 PM
Chris,

You may find this solution to be a lot less expensive than running a gas line and installing a heater. Plus, this heats and cools.

http://www.minisplitwarehouse.com/index.aspx?pageid=315964&prodid=1592432&gs=1&gclid=CNrl5u_HuLQCFQf0nAodDDkA8w

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bergermaister
12-26-2012, 12:22 PM
My garage had a gas heater already there when we moved in. We have a vaulted ceiling so it is mounted up high with vents angled slightly downward. It is a big box kind with a thermostatic fan that kicks on once it's hot enough. The previous owner had also mounted a box fan up high off the ceiling rafters at a 45* angle to help push heat down but I removed that as it was pretty hokey. It came on whenever you turned on the lights.

It is nice to have it up off the ground with an in-house style thermostat on the wall. Nothing to plug in, no wires running anywhere, nothing in the way. Can maintain a fairly constant temp. Natural gas is a lot cheaper than electricity around here too. Ours is piped in off the line for the gas water heater in the corner of the garage so if you could do something like that you may be able to save some coin.

c.rix
12-26-2012, 04:12 PM
it would be nice to have that heat pump for a/c and heat but where you live that heat pump may struggle I know some of those ptac units have 2nd stage electric heat and that gets expensive when its real cold

for my garage I hung a ADP 60k btu unit heater in my 2 car garage.. we use these a lot at work and they have been pretty good I would recommend them or the modine hotdawg. either one of these units would do the job and they make different sizes as well I would recommend a 45-60k btu for a 2 car and a 60 - 75k btu unit for a 3 car. I got mine whole sale for under 400 but i know you can find deals on the internets as well

ChrisK
12-26-2012, 05:04 PM
Wolfe, $900 for that heater/AC is more than I'm looking to spend. I have all the tools and manpower necessary to dig a trench, run the gas line, and install a heater so I'm not too concerned about that end of it. All I'll be paying for are materials and the heater itself. ALTHOUGH, the option of AC would be really cool... no pun intended.

wolfeman131
12-26-2012, 10:50 PM
Not trying to push, but I believe that most places require a licensed plumber has to install a gas line plus local permits, etc. Friends of ours just installed an outdoor fireplace and got hit for over $1k to run an underground gas line about 30 ft.

Somebody on here that knows insurance better than me will probably confirm for you that you want to get this job permitted. In the unfortunate event that you have a catastrophe (I.e. garage fire w/ the boat inside) that can be traced your non-permitted gas line install, you'll be responsible for any repairs/replacement.

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beat taco
12-26-2012, 10:55 PM
I would definitely get a permit but homeowners can do anything from foundations to plumbing to electrical on their own homes.

Mikey
12-27-2012, 09:25 PM
As a certified plumber/gasfitter i somewhat agree. Homeowners can get permits to do most stuff but if your codes are like ours . Gaslines need to be done by a certified gasfitter and permits are a must for insurance to be valid.

Plumbing ,electrical ,building etc can be done as a homeowner as long as its inspected and passes,but GAS is one big exception. Too much potention,for destruction. Look into your local codes......

beat taco
12-28-2012, 09:41 AM
As a certified plumber/gasfitter i somewhat agree. Homeowners can get permits to do most stuff but if your codes are like ours . Gaslines need to be done by a certified gasfitter and permits are a must for insurance to be valid.

Plumbing ,electrical ,building etc can be done as a homeowner as long as its inspected and passes,but GAS is one big exception. Too much potention,for destruction. Look into your local codes......

I agree Mike. After posting I thought there could be a state that has different rules. So while I know for a fact it is perfectly legal in my state (and many others) for homeowners to run their own gas lines, always check your local codes and get a permit before doing anything!
Also if you own a duplex or some other type of multi family dwelling you won't be able to legally do the work yourself.

ChrisK
12-28-2012, 10:01 AM
Thanks for the input guys, I'll be looking into all of it. Don't take ownership until the end of January so I have a little time to plan.

It's a PITA to have to deal with but at the same time I'm excited for it. Never thought I'd be buying a house so soon and I can't wait to make it my own, and do it the right way. Here's a pic of what will be my garage!

http://i842.photobucket.com/albums/zz345/chriskuecker/SVAR117851H_zps86818c2b.jpg

deerfield
12-28-2012, 09:30 PM
Nice garage. Think the one thing I would do is remove the standard door and framing, increase the rough opening height (and width, too, maybe), and replace with an oversize roll up door. Leave the other door standard. Again, nice garage.

jpetty3023
12-28-2012, 09:38 PM
Great looking garage, and I second Deerfield. It's way to convenient and nice at the end of the day to just back your baby in with the tower up. I can promise you it will get old real quick having to break her down each time out


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ChrisK
12-31-2012, 09:26 AM
Actually that's not really an option. Obviously anything can be done if you have the guts to do it, but this garage already has a second level built in to it so, at this point in time, I don't really feel like ripping it out to make room for the boat. The main floor has a nine foot ceiling, then in the back of the garage there's a set of stairs going up to the attic. I'll probably use the attic for storage at first, then maybe when we get settled I'll turn it into a project and build a bar/entertainment area or something up there.

Jpetty, I know what you mean about breaking down the tower every time out. I keep my boat at my parents house on a lift (about an 8 minute drive from where my house will be!) and if the river level is high enough I have to break the tower down just to get on the lift and raise it out of the water. This past summer we got real lucky and the water levels never came up and I never had a reason to break the tower down.

viking
01-07-2013, 09:35 PM
Get the gas line run and go with something like a HotDawg gas heater.
http://www.modinehvac.com/v2portal/page/portal/hvac/hvacResidentialDefault/hvac_com/residential_hot_dawg/level_2_content2_035.htm
You'll be happy as hell with a temperature controlled garage and never regret it. They are worth their weight in gold. My boat is almost as happy as I am since building my shop :)