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spader
02-12-2014, 10:12 PM
I know these seem like simple questions but since this is my first boat, I figured I would ask the pros especially if there are clear choices I am not aware of. I have a list of items to get together that I have pulled from past posts on this forum but I am trying to finalize a couple of smaller items on my list.

1. I have already purchased the jumper balls for fenders since that was recommended here but what do most people use to attach these to the boats and what length?

2. I am also looking at the box anchor. I know they claim that you need less line with the box anchor. Do you use an anchor buddy type of product or something else and once again, what length. I know this varies depending on conditions. Our boat will rarely be kept on the water and when it is, it will likely be anchored off shore.

3. What do people use for dock lines to tie to the dock if needed and is there a recommended length.

4. Do I really need a tow rope?

As you can tell, I am not exactly sure what I need as far as ropes/lines go because I wasn't sure if some of these can cross over and be used for multiple different purposes. I do want to make sure if purchase what I need though.

Thanks for your help!


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lsvboombox
02-12-2014, 10:53 PM
I always carry towropes. There are a lot of crappy boats on the lake that may need your help... I just used 2 of the heavier tube ropes. Hook one each to your tie downs and the other ends to the bow eye of the other boat

mmandley
02-12-2014, 10:55 PM
1. I prefer 5.8 rops and between 6-9ft in length. This gives enough length to drop the ball to the needed hieght and still tie off to your tower, or cleats.

2. I have 2 sections of rope i use. 2x 100ft, I normally only need the 100 but then I have the second if i need it.
I dont use an anchor buddy, If my boat is tied up its normally shallow enough I can walk out to it.

3. As above I prefer 5/8 ropes. 6-9ft I have several tied to my Exile Balls, then I keep 4 extra on the boat for what ever reasons I need them.

4. I have a pretty heavy duty rope I use to tow the big air plane wing tube we have. I use this if i need to tow someone in.

I have found the most important thing on the boat is Knife, flashlight, Fuses, Needle nose, reg plyers, cresent wrench, flat screw driver, philips driver, 3/8 ratchet kit with sizes from 8mm-9/16th. That covers almost any size you might need for an on the water repair.

I also carry 2 rider flags, incase I lose one or someone on the water needs 1. I have a real nice one then I always grab a couple cheap ones when I'm at the dealer or someplace offering them.

Woody929
02-12-2014, 11:23 PM
2nd the knife.

Last year we ended up getting a line tangled in the prop. It took nearly 2 hours of swimming under the boat while anchored to untangle it. Had I had a knife, I could have cut it away instead of unwinding it. After I got it untangled, I ordered a dive knife on Amazon before we pulled the anchor.

wolfeman131
02-13-2014, 12:24 AM
Dive mask or goggles for when you're having to use the knife. I'd suggest a knife with a serrated blade or edge so you can saw thru the rope.

bergermaister
02-13-2014, 02:11 AM
All good suggestions.

-Wire cutter can cut rope fairly well if a knife doesn't (speaking from a few experiences)
-Spare keys - stashed up under compartment or dash somewhere.

In addition to the various ropes I've started to carry a small spool of string or twine in with my tools. If we encounter a stump or rock up near the beach where we pull up for the day I'll take an empty water bottle and tie it off as a marker. This little tip has saved our butts, and prop, (and probably others) on more than one occasion.

Ian Brantford
02-13-2014, 05:37 AM
I prefer slightly thinner longer dock lines. I think that mine are 3/8"x15'. This has them thin enough to easily fit through the boat's pop-up cleats along with the 1/4" fender loops, and long enough to float the boat off the trailer and just walk to the adjacent dock. This lets us vacate the ramp immediately, even if various crew are prepping or using the loo.

Having an extra dock line or two is good for general purpose tying. For example, when docking overnight at a cottage, I use a third dock line as a backup in case one of those cleats on the decaying dock gives way overnight.

+1 on having a heavy tube rope (50' polypropylene rated for 4K lbs, looped at both ends) to double as a boat tow rope.

I use conventional cylindrical fenders. The stern fender is whatever the most common one is at the supply store -- 6"x18", I think. For the bow, I have a larger one, 8"x24" or so. Smaller ones get pushed out of the way too easily.

I have a box anchor that I haven't used yet. Since the occasions that I drop anchor are typically in no more than 25' of water, I use only a 50' section of anchor rope. It has loops with metal reinforcements preset at both ends. I use simple spring spring-loaded carabiners at each end for our lunchtime breaks, but I'd do it right if I ever anchored overnight. I have a small Danforth backup anchor with 100' of line. Anchor lines should be nylon, which is fairly stretchy.

I have two cheap plastic crates as dry boxes. In one, under the observer seat, is all of the smaller or less-used items related to watersports on the boat -- extra gloves, goggles, wakeboard binding screws and fins, pump for the hydrofoil's shock absorber, and other accessories that accumulate over the years. In the other box, stored under the lounge seat behind the driver, are tools, safety and first aid items. Items that I would add to what's listed by others above would be a large pair of pliers (for fasteners that are too big for smaller sockets), After-Bite bug bite treatment, emergency whistle, paper towels, extra oil of correct viscosities for engine and V-drive, funnel with tip narrow enough for V-drive.

Permanently located in a cupholder near the stern is a large Phillips screwdriver for wakeboard binding screws.

For a wakeboard tow rope, always use one of the current no-stretch lightweight materials, such as Spectra. Use an actual wakeboarding handle. Forget the cheap stuff from the hardware store, where you get polypropylene rope that stretches and handles that sink after an hour of immersion in water. We always keep at least TWO wakeboarding tow ropes in the boat. The main one is a Straightline Flat Line that adjusts in sections from 50' to 80' (http://www.bartswatersports.com/catalog.asp?P=97351). The other is some long-forgotten brand that's permanently set to 75' and has a deep V handle for learning on the hydrofoil ski, but can be repurposed if the Straightline gets lost or damaged. I also have a very old sacrificial line with a loop tied at about 30' to give beginner wakeboarders a less threatening start, closer to the boat. I don't know why they sell tow ropes in blue or green. Pick colours that have high contrast on the water! White, yellow and orange are best.

Here are two pieces of extra safety equipment that few use, but I do!
1. Bug Eye crash goggles, to prevent "eye opener" effect from a face plant. http://www.bartswatersports.com/catalog.asp?P=4427
2. Neck Roll to reduce risk of hyperextension whiplash-type injuries to the neck. This works best in conjunction with a helmet. http://www.cinchmax.com/id3.html

Of course, we have helmets in a variety of sizes. A watersport helmet MUST fit correctly to be of benefit. Most of mine are older ProTec, but one of them is a newer Bern and it's much better. Any newer helmets that I get will probably be Bern brand. Ear flaps are mandatory, but the Bern ones need to have more vent holes drilled through them.

patrick232
02-13-2014, 08:24 AM
A floating knife is what I bought after a rope and prop issue.
First Aid kit
One thing that I like to do is match the lines to the boat color, then when time to leave you an easily tell who's is who's.
Suction Cup Coolies.

kaneboats
02-13-2014, 10:46 AM
I would add:

1. Floating key chain for your keys and your extra key hidden up under the dash.
2. Extra sunscreen/bugspray, etc.-- whatever would mess up your day if it was forgotten.
3. Last year's impeller in a plastic bag in your tool kit plus the tools to remove an impeller.
4. Moomba coozies to keep your can/bottle insulated.
5. Beer and ice (this may be #1).

sandm
02-13-2014, 11:12 AM
I also carry 2 rider flags, incase I lose one or someone on the water needs 1. I have a real nice one then I always grab a couple cheap ones when I'm at the dealer or someplace offering them.

I should send you mine. I always carry the main one and 2 spares for the guy that drops it in the lake, but they are not needed out here. I did have to start carrying flares when heading out into the green bay harbor to the sandbar to party. expensive to buy and they have an expiration date. heard it's a hefty fine if you don't have them.

mikenehrkorn
02-13-2014, 11:52 AM
I would suggest reading up on the laws in your state (and any state that you boat in) as some have different rules. For instance I just discovered last year that IL requires you to carry a whistle that can be heard for at least 1/2 mile. I'm not sure if its required in all states, but many require a throwable flotation device SEPARATE from the individual PFDs needed for each person on the boat.

Other than the laws and what others have mentioned, the only thing I would add is a fire extinguisher.

newty
02-13-2014, 12:46 PM
Read through this and I think everything was covered except emergency tape, bailing wire (don't laugh, it saved my week of vacation on the lake once) and a flashlight. I have a big LED mag light as well as a compact one for climbing into tight spaces.

I like boat!

drb59
02-13-2014, 12:46 PM
I carry a all in one tool kit in my boat that has wrenches, socket set, pliers, screwdrivers, etc. It is all in one self contained kit and it has come in handy for me and other boats many times.

mikenehrkorn
02-13-2014, 01:03 PM
I think we have forgotten two key elements of any tool kit..... :)

19262




2013 Outback V
2003 SeaRay 182 -- gone but not forgotten...

mmandley
02-13-2014, 01:10 PM
I should send you mine. I always carry the main one and 2 spares for the guy that drops it in the lake, but they are not needed out here. I did have to start carrying flares when heading out into the green bay harbor to the sandbar to party. expensive to buy and they have an expiration date. heard it's a hefty fine if you don't have them.

Sure I'll take it bro.
I'll be happy to pay shipping, 97111
Let me know what I owe you.

newty
02-13-2014, 01:59 PM
I think we have forgotten two key elements of any tool kit..... :)

19262




2013 Outback V
2003 SeaRay 182 -- gone but not forgotten...

Ha! Yes, well executed!

I like boat!

bergermaister
02-13-2014, 02:52 PM
Laws Schmaws!

Just find a big river, crank up the tunes, crack open a few cold ones, and let 'er rip through a few tight, crowded areas.

Before you know it these guys will catch up with you and tell you EXACTLY what you're missing.




http://i326.photobucket.com/albums/k414/grberglund/MoombaMobiusV/P1120322.jpg

kaneboats
02-13-2014, 03:02 PM
Whenever I see one of those guys that close-up the same question comes to mind -- and I just have to find out the answer:


"I wonder if he can really swim???"

mikenehrkorn
02-13-2014, 03:30 PM
Laws Schmaws!

Just find a big river, crank up the tunes, crack open a few cold ones, and let 'er rip through a few tight, crowded areas.

Before you know it these guys will catch up with you and tell you EXACTLY what you're missing.




http://i326.photobucket.com/albums/k414/grberglund/MoombaMobiusV/P1120322.jpg

Holy crap -- you get a bunch of drug runners and pirates in your area? :) I think all that guy is missing is a rocket launcher and a few grennades!!!


Whenever I see one of those guys that close-up the same question comes to mind -- and I just have to find our the answer:


"I wonder if he can really swim???"

I would guess he would sink like a rock with all that "weight" strapped on him!!!

bergermaister
02-13-2014, 03:45 PM
Pirates or Smugglers? Well......
http://www.moomba.com/msgboard/showthread.php?23205-Disturbing-night-on-the-river

deerfield
02-14-2014, 12:46 AM
Dive mask or goggles for when you're having to use the knife. I'd suggest a knife with a serrated blade or edge so you can saw thru the rope.


Have this in the glove box. Goggles plus knife and pliers on a wrist leash. Easy to see what you are doing underwater and never lose a tool.

gregski
02-14-2014, 03:31 AM
Oars.

I can't be the only one? They take up very little space since they lay nice and flat. And when you need them, you will be so thankful they are there. I last used mine this fall. The engine started fine so I just let it float off of the trailer, but the transmission wouldn't engage (cable came out of mount). There was a bit of breeze and before we knew it, we were a few hundred feet off of the dock. Given the time of year, we were basically the only ones on the water so no one was there to help.

+1 for knife and googles

I'll also add bottle openers... they seem to disappear quickly.

spader
02-14-2014, 07:19 AM
Thanks everyone. Like I have said in the past, I am new to this game so I appreciate everyone's input.

Although I have scoured this forum as well as other forums, there are additional suggestions in this post that I think are great!

Now I just have to get my list finalized and see what the damage is.

spader
02-14-2014, 07:28 AM
On last question although this is a little off topic, do most people use RockTamers to prevent rock chips. I am looking at RockTamers but before I purchase them, I want to make sure there isn't a different product I should be looking at.

jpetty3023
02-14-2014, 10:45 AM
I just picked up a cheap pair of binos to put in the boat this year.


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Ian Brantford
02-14-2014, 12:53 PM
In my earlier reply, I did not bother to list things that are required by law in most areas. One item to single out is paddles. You should carry two (even if only one is required), and I highly recommend the ones that double as boat hooks and have telescoping handles. Here are two examples:

http://www.thechandleryonline.com/product_info.php?products_id=7767

http://www.thechandleryonline.com/product_info.php?products_id=6359

They can both push and pull. In addition to paddling water during an engine failure, their hook/push functions are very handy around the dock or trailer when other boats docked in your way, or during high winds.

The telescoping handles make it easy to keep them in any of the main storage areas.

kaneboats
02-14-2014, 01:04 PM
Nobody has mentioned this either but, if this is your first boat, especially if you have driven outboard and I/O boats but have limited or no inboard experience, it is advisable to practice driving before you take people out. Inboard boats have unique characteristics such as: rudder steering responds much more slowly at low speeds and also makes it nearly impossible to back up to the port side. Practice backing up and shifting to forward to straighten out. You will find you use reverse a lot more for correcting your direction. Practice approaching a dock at a 45 degree angle on the port side of the dock, then using reverse to pull the aft end toward (to starboard) the dock. You can go out in the middle of a body of water and toss some buoys overboard. Practice slowing, stopping, etc. near them without running them over. Have fun and good luck!!!!

Sharpshooter
02-14-2014, 03:57 PM
Its funny you mentioned the steering difference,got a friend who bought him a nice used LSV after I bought mine and he now has it up for sale. He could never get used to the steering

kaneboats
02-14-2014, 04:08 PM
Make a nice tight "U" turn at 32 mph without slowing down and you learn to love the steering!

Sharpshooter
02-14-2014, 06:02 PM
One day I was trying to back up to the pumps on the lake and I guess the guy felt sorry for me, so he reached out with a long hook and hooked the tower and pulled me over, he finally said dont feel bad he has to pull most all of the inboards over to the pumps, I guess I did sorta look like a monkey *&%# a football

Woody929
02-14-2014, 11:45 PM
You guys must have some decent water if you can use goggles. Normally, we can't see but maybe a foot. So goggles aren't much use. Maybe the zebra muscles will fix that for us.

Last year, we were down by the dam and sitting on the platform. I was surprised that I could almost see my feet thanks to the zebras.

gregski
02-16-2014, 12:59 PM
You guys must have some decent water if you can use goggles. Normally, we can't see but maybe a foot. So goggles aren't much use.

Our visibility is probably about 1-2 feet as well but goggles are still essential if you need to cut a rope off of the prop. It would be impossible to do by feel.

Woody929
02-16-2014, 01:30 PM
Wasn't impossible, but nearly. I might need to get some anyway for the just in case.

rdlangston13
02-16-2014, 04:05 PM
Our visibility is probably about 1-2 feet as well but goggles are still essential if you need to cut a rope off of the prop. It would be impossible to do by feel.

I wouldn't say impossible. We have done it more than once by feel


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