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Pike
03-06-2007, 08:50 PM
So I finally got the "OK" from the wife to buy my first boat. I'm going to the boat show in April to get it.

What I need are all the "ins and outs" of buying a boat. Especially what are the Must Haves as far as options. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Also from reading some of the posts the Outback V seems to be a good "starter boat". Is it really necessary to have a starter boat? Would it be a mistake to go with a bigger boat as my first one? Also If I go with the V, will I down the road wish I had gone with a bigger boat?


I have alot of questions and your help is needed.

Thanks

moombadaze
03-06-2007, 09:02 PM
we have a 2003 lsv mobius-basically same boat as new outback v

we have very much enjoyed this boat
kinda not to big not to small size
but we normally dont have a lot of people with us
but have had 8 in it for the day a was not cramped feeling
lots of storage

options i would recomend
wake plate
tower
bimini top
stereo
perfect pass is real popular but i dont have-but im a
biginer wakeboarder with bad ankles and knees

i would buy again if i ever get rid of mine

stacy


ps if your in florda come to the jamboree

Wolf-
03-06-2007, 09:24 PM
Is it really necessary to have a starter boat? Would it be a mistake to go with a bigger boat as my first one? Also If I go with the V, will I down the road wish I had gone with a bigger boat?



1. Buy the boat you want to have in 3 years.
Most first time buyers buy too small or underpowered (power won't be an issue with Moomba!) and tend to hate their purchase or trade in in that time period. (please dont make me look up the research in Motorboating, or Boating, but its a recuring theme)

2. Test drive all the boats you might be interested in.

3. Take the family and your gear. Throw the cooler and bags in. See if they take up floor space. Does the gear actually fit in the storage spaces? Put the kids in the seats.

4. If money is the issue, refer to #1. You may need to wait.

pickle311
03-06-2007, 09:29 PM
the Outback V is a great boat for the price, the new LSV is freaking sweet, it's all about money. What are you going to be using the boat for, wakeboarding, skiing, tubing, just hanging out, surfing? How big is your family and how many people do you anticipate will be on your boat on a regular basis? That's the most important things to take into consideration. You want to comfortable while out on the lake. As for options that are a must, I say the extended warranty, boat cover, board racks, bimini, ballast, wake plate, perfect pass, and stereo. The heater and hot water shower would be nice too depending on whre you live.
good luck

Wolf-
03-06-2007, 09:29 PM
4. If money is the issue, refer to #1. You may need to wait.

Ok, that was the official speal.

Buy the boat you can afford, have fun, take the trade in hit (won't be as bad as car or that Sea Ray your buddy bought) when you outgrow the one you got.

Do keep the other things in mind but remember this is a luxury purchase and enjoy it.

zabooda
03-06-2007, 11:05 PM
Go for the boat that meets your needs. Going to a new starter boat will cost you $$ for taxes, tags and depreciation coming off the showroom floor. This forum is great for getting feedback for a boat that meets your needs. You just need to explain what your looking for and these people will lead you in the right direction. Years ago, I had the boat in mind but it wasn't but five years ago that I had the means to get it. Fortunately, I'm not too old to enjoy it. If you have the means to get a boat of your choice, go for the one you want and enjoy it for a long time.

Pike
03-07-2007, 02:43 AM
All very helpfull answers, if anyone else has an opinion feel free to express it.

I guess in responce to the question of what I am looking for...I want to wakeboard, pull a tube for all the girls that are too scared to try wakeboarding and just hang out on the river and or lake.

Thanks again

drhodes5
03-07-2007, 12:21 PM
Never owned a boat before??? I don't know if I would start with a 40k inboard boat. Every new boat owner makes "mistakes" with there boats. I would just buy a used floater with a motor, that you could resale for what you payed for it. That being said, I love my 2006 LSV. I have three teenage sons and the boat is plenty big. Don't skimp on the options. Tower, wakeplate, perfect pass, and ballest are a must.

JoeTechie
03-07-2007, 01:18 PM
I agree that this is a pretty hefty first boat. Also handiling of an inboard tow boat is tough for experienced drivers. This boat does NOT back up to the port. Period. Handling the V is tough, handling the LSV is even harder. The average runnabout is 18' plus maybe a foot of outdrive or outboard. The "V" is 20' Plus swim platform, the LSV is over 24' long with platform !

I LOVE my LSV, but I've been boating for 35 years, and have all my USCG training courses and lisences, and still had to get used to driving this boat.

Both are amazing boats. If you feel like tossing another $5000 into the pot, get the LSV and go nuts. I think the smaller boat will be more managable, and yet still HUGE comparred to most 18' runabouts for interior usable space!

Go sit in each, take some kids to feel how it will be with passengers, get a test drive of them if possible, the $ is yours to spend.

Read threads here on "deals" - moomba is probably the simplest boat to buy once you decide on all the things you want - get the factory incentives (3 year bumber to bumper is manditory if offered), then work the deal for another $500- 1000 off or so and drive home with the best deal in watersports tow boats... period.

-Joe

Buttafewcoe
03-07-2007, 02:05 PM
By all means get a Moomba. However, as in the above posts, my starter craft was a 10 yr old Bayliner 19 footer. I got it for a number of reasons
.
A) to see if I'd even like owning a boat
B) not a lot of money to get started
C) what care or upkeep was needed in owning one
D) to gain experience operating one
.
I'm sure there were several more reasons besides those i just listed, but I think you get the idea. I will tell you I learned a whole lot of "what not to do's" on the Bayliner that would've killed me using as a learning experience on my Outback.
.
Hope this helps, good luck with your purchase.
.
B

Pike
03-08-2007, 08:01 PM
Well after reading these last few posts, I'm a little worried about spending 35-40k on my first boat. I mean its not like I have never operated a boat before but now Im alittle worried.

What sort of "learning experiances" are you talking about?

Thanks

gt9118
03-08-2007, 08:20 PM
ahhhhhhh You have to buy on impulse and worry about the consequences later. Driving a boat is not rocket science. I say spend the 40K!!!!

qb12
03-08-2007, 08:58 PM
Well after reading these last few posts, I'm a little worried about spending 35-40k on my first boat. I mean its not like I have never operated a boat before but now Im alittle worried.

What sort of "learning experiances" are you talking about?

Thanks

Pike, I hope you don't take your "possible" moomba brothers trying to talk you out of a inboard boat. By all means they are the best boats that are out on the market, along with holding their resale value way above i/o's and outboards.

i think what they are trying to say is getting a inboard boat is different that all the others. (to the plus)

Is the dealer you are working with, willing to do some on water teaching. If so then go for it. The main difference is these boats don't turn "at all" moving in reverse. But with some teaching you will learn to move these bad boys on a dime. :D

I grew up skiing behind a mc as a youth (supra and moomba's were not made that long ago) :oops: and drove it some. When i purchased my 1st boat it was a used outback. I really learned a lot and also taught my gf and son to handle it. Now I have a awesome vdrive...

If you have any questions, feel free to pm me.

Doug

zabooda
03-08-2007, 09:45 PM
I still say go for the boat you want. There are two issues that were new to me when I went to a direct drive and other people may have more but one issue is the backing up and the other issue is the inability to raise the prop out of the water.

The backing up process seems to be more critical leaving the dock. Taking the boat out during times when there is little boat activity at the docks (like this time of year) helps to learn the characteristics of the boat in reverse. If you feel uncomfortable when the launch is busy then you can find other ways to get the boat out such as walking it to the end of the dock or nosing the boat around or let people know your new at boating and they will help as we all have gone through the same learning curve. Just take it easy getting out and if you get near something you can push off from there and not bang into things.

The stationary location of the prop was a big concern of mine when I bought my first DD. I did mess up a prop or two with my I/O but I learned the surroundings and I haven't dinged my DD prop ....yet. If I'm in unfamiliar areas I try to be cautious and stay in the deep part, follow other boats or idle through areas first and check the depth.

DDs are a blast and I wouldn't go back to I/Os for what I do.

Nafplio
03-09-2007, 01:40 AM
Boats are luxury items. They cost a lot and not only when you buy. I'd get something you can afford and really like (in that order). You can find great value in a good used boat, just have to look. I started with a jet ski, then had an I/O, and now a v-drive. My experience is that you will outgrow the first two very quickly. And learning to drive an inboard is not rocket science; plenty of info around.
I've been very happy with my LSV. Also, impressed by the new LSV. Good luck with your search. Post some pics when you get yours.

Ian Brantford
03-09-2007, 01:43 AM
So I finally got the "OK" from the wife to buy my first boat. I'm going to the boat show in April to get it.

Great. If you cannot test drive there, I recommend that you find what dealers will be at the show and visit them for a drive beforehand. I took my test drive in December in Ontario -- in a snowstorm! Whee!

I echo the advice given by others about seeing if you gear fits, bringing others to spot issues, etc. I would caution them about showing emotion though. You don't want the sales staff to see you as over-eager. I shopped with a male buddy, not with my girlfriend!



What I need are all the "ins and outs" of buying a boat. Especially what are the Must Haves as far as options. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.


See my verbose thread here: http://www.moomba.com/msgboard/viewtopic.php?t=1831



Also from reading some of the posts the Outback V seems to be a good "starter boat". Is it really necessary to have a starter boat? Would it be a mistake to go with a bigger boat as my first one? Also If I go with the V, will I down the road wish I had gone with a bigger boat?


My experience is much like Buttafewcoe's -- I had an already-used I/O runabout for quite a while before stepping up to an inboard wakeboarding boat. This was good preparation for the feel of a multi-thousand-pound floating item, and the responsibility of being in charge of everyone's safety, without panicking about property value. You mentioned elsewhere in the thread that you have driven a boat before. However, it's not clear whether you refer to something like an 18+' fibreglas boat (good), a cartopper fishing boat, a deck boat, oceanliner, etc. Unless it was something of a similar configuration, you have quite a learning experience ahead of you.

If it was a runabout that you drive, the balky reverse and the increased underwater collision risk are your main negatives in an inboard, and you'll adapt. In normal operation (especially while towing), inboards are better for steering, tracking and accurate speed control. Plus, you don't have to keep warning swimmers, boarding at the stern, to be careful of the sharp propeller... every frickin' time.

You also mentioned elsewhere that you main interests were wakeboarding, tubing, and just hanging out. All of Moomba's direct drive models will be very good for these things. I guess that your worries about buying too little boat should be driven by how hard-core of a wakeboarder you are, and how popular you are going to be! If you want complete doubt removal about having a big wake, or if you want comfort for more than about 7 people, go with the XLV like I did. Otherwise, the Outback or LSV will be a bit cheaper, and easier to wrangle off the water.

Oh, and about towing a tube: 1. gleefully ignore complaints from others about how unfashionable it is to tow a tube with a wakeboard boat; 2. Believe the speedometer, not your intuition, because you are going 5MPH faster than you think, and the rider is having a hard time hanging on. :-)

drhodes5
03-10-2007, 11:30 PM
Well now I feel bad for being Mr. Negative. I did not intend to talk you out of buying a Moomba, I was just trying to be honest. As for the "mistakes" I will just list a few of my own. Watched a friend drive my new boat on shore, scratched hull and destroyed prop. Trailer not in water straight, very large deep scratch down hull. Did not get water out of heater coil in winter, replaced coil. Thats just a few of my mistakes and luckely they were on lesser boats. I guess when it comes down to it, its just a boat and shit happens.

JoeTechie
03-26-2007, 12:58 AM
I just purchased my 07 GG this weekend. From what I'm reading I think I got an ok deal.

I paid $49791 out the door for:

07 XLV GG
Bimini
Docking Lights
Cast Pop-up cleats
am/fm cd
Wakeplate
Gravity III Ballast
Wakeboard Rack
Guidepole Covers
Logo Cover
Detachable tower feet

um....

So much for a "starter boat" :shock:

"Go big or go home" usually spoken around your house ??? Or did you just get upsold 5 times!!! (outback -> "V" -> LSV -> XLV -> XLV GG ed.)

I hope you get loads of enjoyment from it... all that stuff we said about driving - this thing is massive - please take some time to get used to it at slow speeds, and get lots of fenders. ;)

-Joe

Pike
03-26-2007, 02:58 AM
um....

So much for a "starter boat" :shock:

"Go big or go home" usually spoken around your house ??? Or did you just get upsold 5 times!!! (outback -> "V" -> LSV -> XLV -> XLV GG ed.)

I hope you get loads of enjoyment from it... all that stuff we said about driving - this thing is massive - please take some time to get used to it at slow speeds, and get lots of fenders. ;)

-Joe

Yes Yes I know......crazy pike got in over his head. :D However the phrase "go big or go home" never entered my mind when I signed the dotted line.

Actually after we test drove the Outback V I was extremely impressed with how it handled and the boat in general. Although my wife called it a "fishing boat". :o Because of how small it was.

Hopefully I wont regret going so big. Thanks again for all the advice.