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qb12
05-21-2007, 11:25 AM
question for all of you. what do you do or say when you see someone doing power turns to pick up a downed rider?

reason asking is it seems more and more people are buying wakeboard boats, either true inboards or io's with towers and the problems seem to be getting worse.

yesterday i bet i had 3-5 people in one cove doing power turns and basically destroying all the good water. heck one of them who just bought a used supra was even going around his rider on the port side which is just dangerous!!!

Buttafewcoe
05-21-2007, 12:13 PM
I don't do it, however, early in the season when the water temp is still a bit chilly I tend to 'hustle back' to get the rider. Although I would not call that a power turn as I cut throttle before making the turn, then go a fuzz faster than idle to get back to the downed skier
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Hope this helps
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B

zabooda
05-21-2007, 02:15 PM
I will do a sharp turn if there are obstructions in the way (boats or land) or if I consider the downed skier to be at risk where I need to get back to the skier as quickly as possible. I usually stay away from those situations as much as possible but there are a few idiots who follow too close. The wave created in a turn still messes up the water whether it is a gradual turn or sharp turn granted the size of the outside wake will be much larger in a sharp turn. I try not to turn sharp as it messes up anything not attached like people and beers.

04OUTBACK
05-21-2007, 03:32 PM
That is how it was when I grew up skiing... EVERYONE did a powerturn... Now, I think most still do that cuz that's what Dad did... Watching the BOOK DVD, they do a good job of teaching how to turn around to pick up downed rider.. I don't think too MANY boaters know much about rules and etiquette... at least around me..

cptmoomba
05-21-2007, 04:06 PM
I completely agree with 04. Until I started checking out etiquette articles on wakeboarding sites, I was guilty of doing what my dad did back on a sparsley populated lake. Different story nowadays in more congested lakes.

It would be nice to get all the boat owners that do any kind of activities to adopt some basic guidelines. It would make everyones day much more pleasant.

Oh and btw, why do tubers, that are doing nothing but creating cirucular rollers to mindlessly give their kids concussions, why do they need to be in a cove. All the waves readily available on the main lakes should make their objective that much easier to achieve.

-- Sorry for the last just my ever-growing pet-peeve.

JesseC
05-21-2007, 05:41 PM
Oh and btw, why do tubers, that are doing nothing but creating cirucular rollers to mindlessly give their kids concussions, why do they need to be in a cove. All the waves readily available on the main lakes should make their objective that much easier to achieve.

-- Sorry for the last just my ever-growing pet-peeve.

I know why, beacause all the really good "concusion" waves are made by the wakeboarders that hide in the coves! The family I/O simply can not create the proper effect on their own! So they follow us and wait for that perfect Double Up to sling the younguns through!!

I am completely with you on this one. They should go out to the "open" choppy water and scramble their childs brain out their instead.

04OUTBACK
05-21-2007, 08:22 PM
TRU DAT on TUBERS! It's nothing but S CURVES and Donuts here!

davidl
05-22-2007, 02:15 AM
8) I am a I/O x owner and have always wanted A great tour boat ride but The snobb effect that follows with this is relavant. Just read the last post! I believe we are a better group having purchashed useing our brains and not our wallets and we have a great boat for the $. OK Off the pedistal, What I have found is when the skier/boarded drops line you drop thottle and do a slow turn and motor up to the person, If in a bad situation you do what is nessesary to protect the person in the water from harm but the bottom line is the capton of the boat picks the safe spot to pull a person................ we should always think 2- minutes ahead and please pull your keys when just playing in the water..David :D

drhodes5
05-22-2007, 11:15 AM
The only way I have found to deal with the power turning, tubing, and just bad drivers is to get out early. The only people that seem to be at the lake at sunrise are the people that know how to drive.

Buttafewcoe
05-22-2007, 11:19 AM
TRUE DAT on EARLY!!!!
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:D
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B

zabooda
05-22-2007, 11:41 AM
Morning runs is the time I go out when the tubers, jet skiers and yachters are still cutting zzzzzzz’s.

SiglooLSV
05-22-2007, 04:36 PM
word....

lowdrag
05-23-2007, 02:30 AM
A lot of what has been said here is true. People do what they've seen others do or what they learned to do growing up. Many don't take the time to properly educate themselves on proper safety/etiquette when being on the water especially when it comes to water sports. People, including me until I started educating myself, falsely believe that the faster you can get back to the rider the safer it is. They don't think about things like the fact that not only are the ruining the water for others but they are also throwing rollers back at the rider. That's not pleasant for the rider and also creates a safety problem because you can lose sight of the person when they dip down into the troughs.

Take it as an opportunity to make some friends that are into the same thing that you are. Wait for them to get done with a set. While they're changing riders introduce yourself. Make some small talk and then suggest that there is plenty of room for everyone to enjoy themselves and then educate them on the etiquette of power turns.

I'm betting most people would be pretty receptive to the suggestion and maybe a little embarrassed that they didn't know better. For the ones that can't take a hint or just want to give attitude, fill the ballast up and spend the next half hour running in circles at about 11 mph. :twisted:

JesseC
05-23-2007, 12:30 PM
For the ones that can't take a hint or just want to give attitude, fill the ballast up and spend the next half hour running in circles at about 11 mph. :twisted:

I tried this once, be sure that you DO NOT hit one of your own Mega-triple rollers head on, it knocks every screw in the boat loose as well as giving everyone in the boat one heck of a concussion!! :shock:

Wolf-
05-23-2007, 02:22 PM
We have a printed/laminated copy of these rules in the tow vehicle for our guests to read. Ya'll are welcome to borrow/steal/copy these and law the law down for your guests as well.

Boat Driver Etiquette is another list to come.

---------------
Boat owners have invested quite a bit and are graciously offering you the opportunity to enjoy the day with them. With that in mind, the rules:

1. Always take your shoes off when entering the vessel even if the owner does not. The owner will be more than happy to stow them for you.

2. Watch what you bring into the boat. Doritos and Cheetos taste great, but having them rubbed into the carpet is not. Also, finding a Dorito two weeks later that is hidden by something is not pleasant. Other items that apply would be anything that will melt (chocolate, candy) or that sticks (peanut butter).

3. If you brought it onto the boat, take it off the boat. No owner likes to clean up trash stuffed in the storage areas when he gets home. Plastic bags are always available for trash.

4. All children eat on the swim platform. If your eating habits are like that of a child, the owner will probably make you eat back there as well.

5. Bring something to drink. This is a non alcoholic craft. Boating/watersports and alcohol DO NOT MIX.

6. If you can only come for 30 minutes, please, don’t bother coming. There are few things worse than then having to stop and take someone back to the dock. It wastes riding time.

7. Please do not step on the seats. The sides are low enough that taller passengers can step over them easily. Smaller passengers should be assisted as they step on the gunwales.

8. The vinyl on this craft is very stain resistant, however two things stain almost on contact. They would be pollen and oily suntan lotion. Please apply suntan lotion on the swim platform. You should be applying your suntan lotion long before you really need it. It actually needs to soak into the skin to be effective!

9. Never ride first unless you are told by the owner to go. The owner gets to choose whether or not he wants the first glass. More often then not he will defer to someone else.

10. Never let the owner go last. He has to have his fun too.

11. Always volunteer to drive.

12. Do not ride for more than 15 minutes. Everybody else in the boat has to ride too, but if the owner wants to ride for 40 minutes let him. It is his boat and he can.

13. Always offer money. Ski boats burn nearly 5 gallons an hour and a party boat can burn around 3. But the costs to operate a boat are more than just fuel, there is maintenance, insurance, trailer tags, and registration to consider.

14. Always offer to clean the boat. Cleaning usually means wiping down the boat at the end of the day, but if you are a regular you should volunteer to do more. On the days when it is blown out come over and help wax, or clean the interior.

15. Never invite someone else to come along without first talking to the boat owner

16. Inboards should not be “beached”. So, be prepared to wade/swim ashore if no dock is immediately available.

JesseC
05-24-2007, 10:57 AM
Wolf, I have stolen and printed your rules. I really like them.

You need to add one though.

17) If you are bringing a guest named Ed G you must supply one trash bag to collect any projectile particals exerted from above said individual!

moombadaze
05-24-2007, 10:59 AM
i just printed it out, but i modified it with a date and signature with
a spot to be notorized, with the disclaimer at the bottom that says
all rules will be followed or its a long swim back from the middle
of the lake and all beer will become boat owners beer :lol: :shock:

stacy

zabooda
05-24-2007, 12:42 PM
I like the rules but I would be the biggest violator of them. I can usually control my guests it's the things I have no control over that concern me like the kid on the out of control jetski and Bubba the dock dog who loves to jump in everyones boat for a great big slobbery kiss. Actually, I could find the dog amusing but not the kid.

I do tell people with kids that it is great to see the kids drink juice and it makes mom and dad look good but juice makes my boat look bad so keep the juice home and teach your kids to drink diet sodas. As far as food, I thought that was what the engine cover on my DD was for. I do lay out a beach towel over the cover first..so you have something to wipe your mouth on when eating. With peanuts, I teach the guests how much throw you need to clear the back of the boat with the shells.

gotmyboat
05-24-2007, 01:31 PM
I know from previous posts that Wolf uses his boat with the youth group. That is one situation where having everyone read the rules is a good idea.

I always have my kid's friends on the boat with us. I have a set of rules, but they are all about safety. Many of these kids have never been on a boat and don't know the inherent danger if they are not careful. My rules are given to any new passengers (young or old) once we are all on the boat but before any activities take place. For the purposes of these rules, the captain is the person who is driving the boat.

1. The captain is responsible for everyone in the boat, and you must always do what the captain asks you to do.
2. Children under 13 must always wear PFD.
3. If over 13, the captain might still ask to wear a PFD.
4. Everyone must wear a PFD when engaging in any watersport.
5. Nobody gets in the water before asking the captain.
6. Nobody starts the motor except for the captain.
7. When in the water, always stay clear of the prop.
8. When underway, passengers must be seated.
9. Watch out for each others and make everyones safety your concern.

On my boat, before the motor is started I ask if the prop is clear and do a quick head count.
I have friends who have had serious injuries on their boats because of inexperienced passengers. I don't mind cleaning out my boat and even dealing with stains, as long as they are not blood stains that could have been avoided.

Be safe out their this Memorial Day weekend.

Dave

Wolf-
05-24-2007, 02:30 PM
I know from previous posts that Wolf uses his boat with the youth group. That is one situation where having everyone read the rules is a good idea.

Thats exactly the reason. My father in law had a boat. And his boat looked pretty bad by the time it was sold. Food and sand ground into the carpeting, torn vinyl, destroyed speakers.

Lisa and I decided from day one, that we would expect the same level of care of the vessel from our guests as we do from ourselves.



On my boat, before the motor is started I ask if the prop is clear and do a quick head count.
I have friends who have had serious injuries on their boats because of inexperienced passengers. I don't mind cleaning out my boat and even dealing with stains, as long as they are not blood stains that could have been avoided.

Be safe out their this Memorial Day weekend.


It really shouldn't surprise us how many folks have no idea how to behave on a boat from either the safety or etiquette perspectives.

On an outing with youth, we spend about 15 minutes learning about safety.
We then do dry watersports training. Learn hand signals, verbal commands, etcs. Then some dry practice getting up on wakeboards or kneeboards. Then we hit the water.

I'll take Georgia clay in the carpet over blood anyday. But if we can eliminate both, I'm even happier.