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Appleknocker
09-05-2008, 08:01 PM
Itís a tragedy that after the beautiful weekend we had for Labor Day it now looks like my boating season has come to an end. Itís tough to get out with a 4 month old in the house, and itís killing me to look at my boat sit in the garage, although she sure does look pretty all shined up. With that being said has anyone attempted to siphon out the gas from their tanks. There is roughly a half tank of gas left in my 2007 Outback V and it would be a shame to have it go bad over the winter when I could use it in my truck now. I thought I saw in some previous post a while back about anti-siphon tanks is this true or not? I figured I would ask the experts before I started huffing gas.

Thanks for the help. By the way Iíll take the cold weather way up here over hurricanes down there any day of the week and twice on Sunday. Good luck with that.

04OUTBACK
09-05-2008, 08:04 PM
You would be better off to fill it up and add Stabil to the tank.
Fill it up FULL
That displaces any air and prevents condensation. The Stabil will keep the gas from going bad. You need to run the engine for a few mins after adding stabil though.

Appleknocker
09-05-2008, 08:06 PM
Actually I have been told the exact opposite from my dealer. They tell me to bring it in with as little gas left as possible. That way if it does go bad you don't have 40 gallons of bad gas to get out of your boat.

tazz3069
09-05-2008, 08:17 PM
Appleknocker--
I was told the same thing. to bring it in with as little gas as possible. They did all the winterizing that was needed. When I pick the boat up, they had added the stabil to the tank. I was also told to fill it up before I put it in storage. I did exactly what they told me. The stabil preserved the gaos. This seasson started and by the second crank, the boat started with no problems and ran great.

zabooda
09-05-2008, 09:13 PM
Empty the tank with the fuel pump. I've been emptying my tanks over the winter for years. With the FI you need to disconnect a hose after the pump.

Disconnect the gas line and put it in the can
Connect a battery source to the fuel pump (NOTE: Keep the hose away from the battery source)
Run the gas out
Empty the fuel filter and replace it
Put a gallon of gas with stabilizer in the tank
Run the gas through the line until it comes out
Reconnect the hose
Run the engine for a while to get the gas into the FI or carb. Fog the engine during this time

I do pump out the remaining gas in the spring using the same method, change the fuel filter and get fresh gas.

maxpower220
09-05-2008, 09:31 PM
Different parts of the country have different weather. With high humidity in the south, you need to add stabil and fill the tank. Otherwise, you will have water in your tank in the spring. Up north, you may not have that problem. Definately use Stabil and have it run through the engine before putting the boat away.

zegm
09-05-2008, 11:22 PM
Lets see the math here, hummmm I start boating in April (without a wetsuit) and put the boat up the end of Oct. again without a wet suit! So I get about 4 more months of boating a year. OK have lived in Panama City now for a little over 5 years. Had a few "exciting Hurricanes" travel near, and I think I saw a limb down in the backyard once, I believe. So 4 months x 5 years = 20 months, 20 months divided by 12 = 1.67 years more of skiing. Yeah you might be right picking that limb off the ground ain't worth the 1.67 years of extra boating I get. I think I will move back (yes I once lived where I saw snow) to Indiana so I don't have to pick up no stinking sticks again!!!!

Removed offensive large font NOT!

Appleknocker
09-06-2008, 12:29 AM
Lets see the math here, hummmm I start boating in April (without a wetsuit) and put the boat up the end of Oct. again without a wet suit! So I get about 4 more months of boating a year. OK have lived in Panama City now for a little over 5 years. Had a few "exciting Hurricanes" travel near, and I think I saw a limb down in the backyard once, I believe. So 4 x 5 = 20 months, 20 months divided by 12 = 1.67 years more of skiing. Yeah you might be right picking that limb off the ground ain't worth the 1.67 years of extra boating I get. I think I will move back (yes I once lived where I saw snow) to Indiana so I don't have to pick up no stinking sticks again!!!!


NOT!!!!!!! :D

Zegm, I can't help but notice the sarcasim in your reply. It's not so much in the whitty reply or the fancy math, which by the way you must have gone to school for because I lost you at 4 x 5 = 20, wow thats way over my head. Nope it was the 60 pt. NOT!!!!! that made your reply stand out. See up here in the North us common folk have trouble adding, for example 2 + 2 = 5. If you think that living in Indiana is North and a dusting of snow is cold you have no idea what your talking about, much like I have no idea what you are talking about with your complicated math, or your hurrincanes. All I know is I like to make the best of my boating season (all be it short) and take care of my boat, as I am planning on keeping it for a while.

Maybe when you respond to my reply you can throw in some Algorithms or Differential equations and really dazzle us. Better yet why don't you come up with a formula to calculate the wind speed as it tears the roof off your house, then when you go outside to pick up the fallen tree limbs you can think to yourself that maybe Indiana wasn't so bad after all.

zegm
09-06-2008, 12:48 AM
Sorry to hurt your feelings, seems like everyone who doesn't live here thinks that every house and every family gets effected by a hurricane. Well it ain't so and it was you that used this mis-information to justify your reasons for living where you do and kind of insulting us for living here. And tell my father who had to leave his house in Indiana for over a month because his pipes froze under ground so that he had no water that that was really not an issue to him.

Sorry, next time I will not use complicated and confusing large font!

Appleknocker
09-06-2008, 12:56 AM
It doesn't look like you will be able to hide from this one. 90-100 mile an hour winds = more than a few broken tree limbs, even I can comprehend that math. Just remember when it comes time to evacuate TAKE THE MOOMBA!!!! I would hate to see a fellow moomba owner lose a boat in a storm.

Oh and by the way it takes more than a half hearted response like yours to hurt my feelings.

zegm
09-06-2008, 01:06 AM
Honestly we have had serious winds here, but I live 20 miles inland. My roof is low and flat and metal. There are building standards that houses have to be built to here just for the wind issues. I guess what I am saying is what causes the most damage during a hurricane is the storm surge. A wall of water 27 feet high hit New Orleans when Katrina visited. Trust me I have to evacuate if we are going to get hit by a CAT 3, a direct hit and yes we will be towing the Moomba behind us. When Dennis came here a couple of years ago we were fine and my inlaws that live in Macon Georgia and begged us to go there to escape the storm were without power for a week when the storm marched up there. We lost it for just a day and that is why every one here has a generator. So no I won't play around with a storm, I have 2 kids. But yes I chose to deal with this so we could play longer with our boats. And dude I am a common man just like you! OK we might be different because I am a cold weather wimp! Ask Sled! Now don't bring up the Alligator issue!!!!

zegm
09-06-2008, 01:12 AM
Oh and to answer your question about the fuel. There are a million boats down here, everyone has one and everyone fills the tank full and puts Stabil in it. The stuff is so popular that it is sold everywhere. And a tank full of air is a tank with moisture in it, condensation issues.

Appleknocker
09-06-2008, 01:17 AM
Ok we will let it go at that, but you still haven't answered my original question. Have you ever tried to siphon the gas out of your boat?

Appleknocker
09-06-2008, 01:19 AM
Ok that seem to be the general consensus.

zegm
09-06-2008, 01:21 AM
Questions, questions, man! :)
Yes out of the MasterCraft all of the time, how do you think I had gas for the lawnmower! Out of the LS no, not sure I can. And like I said above I wouldn't do it for winterizing.

zabooda
09-06-2008, 01:27 AM
Gotta do your homework. Just don't leave E-10 in your tank.


http://www.boatoregon.com/OSMB/news/E10.shtml

Ethanol absorbs water extremely well. Marine fuel systems are very susceptible to water intrusion. E10 has the ability to absorb a certain amount of water into solution and simply allow it to be burned by the engine. Hereís the comparison: MTBE gasoline can hold about 60 ppm (parts per million) of water in solution; E10 can hold 6,000 to 7,000 ppm of water in solution. Meaning, if you have a 100 gallon (378.5 liters) tank, it could hold up to .6 - .7 gallons (2.3 Ė 2.6 liters) of water in solution.

The biggest problem with ethanol for an alternative is with ďphase separation.Ē Thatís what happens when the fuel is saturated beyond itís capacity to hold water in solution. Water and gasoline actually separate, and the gasoline floats on top of the water. With MTBE you could simply pump the water out from under the gasoline, or let your filters remove the water. With E10, ethanol blends more easily with any water. When phase separation occurs in E10, the ethanol is pulled out of the gas and absorbed by water. This results in two solutions, neither of which is good for the engine or fuel systemÖnot to mention the environment. The gasoline left behind is absent of oxygenate. The water left behind now contains a high concentration of ethanol; this solution is highly corrosive and damages any material it may come in contact with in the fuel system. The only solution for phase-separated fuel is to dispose of the entire fuel load, clean the tank, and start over with a fresh tank of E10.

E10ís ability to absorb water has yet another drawback; it can absorb water directly from the atmosphere through the vent while simply sitting in the tank. In just 100 days at 70% humidity, E10 can absorb enough water to phase-separate. The shelf life of E10 is only 60-90 days if left without treatment.

Another important fact to remember is that gasoline ďoxidizesĒ when exposed to air. That is, it loses its volatility over time. A good non-alcohol fuel stabilizer is highly recommended at all times in your boatís fuel. *The key is to not leave a boat for long periods of time with a large load of fuel aboard.

Appleknocker
09-06-2008, 01:41 AM
Their in lies the problem. In Wisconsin which is a major producer of corn, regular gas and mid grade have a 10% blend of Ethonal. The last time I filled up I put in mid grade, I made the mistake of filling the boat knowing I wasn't going to use all of the gas I put in. Belive me if I thought for a minute there was an outside chance I could get back out on the water the burn it up I would. But with a 4 year old and a 4 month old and Grandparents who live 3 hours away it's tough for us to get out. So for know I have added a bottle of StaBil until I decide what to do. Besides the extended forecast doesn't look promising for the north woods, but we don't want to talk about that, do we Zegm.

zabooda
09-06-2008, 02:13 AM
I'm not familiar with FI but you be able to pump it out using the fuel pump. I've heard bad things about E-10 and last year I started to see some discussion on this board and some of it wasn't good.

zegm
09-06-2008, 08:36 PM
Appleknocker,

Math, Boats, Weather, and especially Kids are all good subjects. The ethanol fuel you have, beyond me as it is very rare around here. OK I haven't seen it around here, except in Lower Alabama and that was once. I would take a visit to the Stabil website and see what it says.

Hootreville
09-06-2008, 11:32 PM
Appleknocker,

Got out on the river today. The water temps are still pretty good. Let me know what you find. I will be winterizing my boat next month sometime. With my old boat I left about a quarter of a tank in it and put some stabil in. Never had any issues here or in washington. Oh by the way, as far as your question goes I have no idea!!!!

Appleknocker
09-07-2008, 10:26 AM
Hoot, how are the water levels down stream. Down here in the valley they are really low. I've been on some of the parts where you ride for work and if I remember correctly they are pretty wide and deep.

Hootreville
09-07-2008, 11:43 AM
They are down a little right now, but still plenty deep to load and unload, wakeboard and ski. Unlike Sunset which is getting really low near the boat launch. I'm headed down to Kaukauna in a few to hang out with some friends on the river hope the rain holds off.