PDA

View Full Version : Reverse Steers Only One Direction



moombamaniac
07-28-2009, 04:29 PM
My boat only steers in one direction in reverse. In forward it steers correctly but in reverse it only steers in one direction. How is that possible?

maxpower220
07-28-2009, 04:43 PM
Your engine connects to your prop. Your prop is in front of your rudder on the boat. In forward, your prop sends water over (around) the rudder. The more water going over the rudder, the better the response is for the turning of the boat.
In reverse, your prop pulls water. However, because there is a (relatively) large gap between the rudder and the prop, most of the water does not pass the rudder. Thus, the rudder is ineffective. Also, because your props spins sideways relative to the boat, it pulls water from one side more than anywhere else. The is called "squat", in prop driven planes it is called "P"-factor.
Direct Drives pull to the right in reverse unless you have a CC Nautique (they all pull left).

Now, just practice and use it to your advantage. Thinking ahead of the boat will allow you to manuever it anywhere you need to.

Razzman
07-28-2009, 05:00 PM
A Vdrive can actually be very manuverable if you understand the principles and apply them. Just remember that all manuvers at the dock or alongside another boat are done at extremely slow speed, bumping the throttle is the key.

When backing off the trailer dockside bumping reverse will allow you to back straight up without the stern moving right.

When docking slowly approach (again bump the throttle) the dock on your starboard side at roughly a 20-25 degree angle. As the bow approaches the dock engage reverse and the boat will swing alongside the dock.

Practice this technique by spinning your boat. By engaging forward and reverse in succession you can virtually spin your inboard around within it's own length. A very useful manuver when the ramp is full and you need to get away or are in close confines.

Once you have these techniques down you'll wonder why you worried about it! One of my favs that never fails to impress people is backing to another boats swim platform. I cross the stern of another boat slowly at about a 15 degree angle and reverse slowly and the platform backs right up to the other, great for loading and unloading peeps in your boating party! :D

Vern
07-28-2009, 05:41 PM
My boat only steers in one direction in reverse. In forward it steers correctly but in reverse it only steers in one direction. How is that possible?


Seriously!!!!

BensonWdby
07-28-2009, 06:34 PM
Definitely took some getting used to. But now when I have a chance to drive the neighbors outboard - I have a much harder time coming alongside the dock with the outboard. Slow approach , bumping throttle (reverse-neutral-reverse-neutral-...), and do not shut down until you are at a complete stop where you want to be. I actually prefer it these days, but I am not trailering...

kaneboats
07-29-2009, 11:44 AM
There's nothing easier to drive than an outboard.

gus 08 mobius lsv
07-29-2009, 05:14 PM
A Vdrive can actually be very manuverable if you understand the principles and apply them. Just remember that all manuvers at the dock or alongside another boat are done at extremely slow speed, bumping the throttle is the key.

When backing off the trailer dockside bumping reverse will allow you to back straight up without the stern moving right.

When docking slowly approach (again bump the throttle) the dock on your starboard side at roughly a 20-25 degree angle. As the bow approaches the dock engage reverse and the boat will swing alongside the dock.

Practice this technique by spinning your boat. By engaging forward and reverse in succession you can virtually spin your inboard around within it's own length. A very useful manuver when the ramp is full and you need to get away or are in close confines.

Once you have these techniques down you'll wonder why you worried about it! One of my favs that never fails to impress people is backing to another boats swim platform. I cross the stern of another boat slowly at about a 15 degree angle and reverse slowly and the platform backs right up to the other, great for loading and unloading peeps in your boating party! :D

it does take time to get use to and i was wondering if there was something wrong why it always went one way. never getting my test drive i missed out on finding out the easy pointers and learnin on the fly great advise!

Razzman
07-29-2009, 05:56 PM
Gus you'll get it in no time! ;)

gus 08 mobius lsv
07-29-2009, 07:47 PM
Gus you'll get it in no time! ;)

first time out was pretty rough thats no joke but been out about 10 times now and i'm getting the knack down and really starting to like it. it was just a big adjustment from an outboard!

skiyaker
07-29-2009, 09:15 PM
no doubt the v drive takes some getting used to. I was used to driving a stern drive deck boat that steered best in reverse. When it's windy you basically have to drag that deck boat with the rear end. I'm at the point now where I've found the benefits of the V drive in close quarters- tighter turning radius, shallow draft- to outweigh that big honkin' deck boat. Just have to back her straight up, and spin spin spin baby!

Burke
07-31-2009, 01:44 AM
You can crank the wheel all the way to the left (?? I think it was to the left??) before getting into reverse and it will help to straighten out the path a little. It will still turn, but a lot less than just leaving the wheel centered.

I agree with the others - going slow is key.

zegm
07-31-2009, 08:10 AM
bumping the throttle is one key to inboards, once you get it you can park it on a dime.
I do have dual outboards and this boat I can put anywhere, forward or reverse and even spin it on its axis! But I still love the inboard!!! Just remember that it will go right in reverse and use it to your advantage, then throw in forward and bump, bump, bump to get your bow where you want it to be!

gcnettl
07-31-2009, 09:43 PM
My rudder broke one time, and using reverse was the only way to steer. Now is when things get complicated. You would think a boat in forward would hold a straight line. No. As the prop spins, it "torques" the boat one way. Usually to starboard. So as I drove a little, I had to reverse a little, drive a little, reverse a little... Less learned, if you get shallow and hit mud, do no back out of it. Get out of the boat into the water, and push it.

mmandley
08-01-2009, 07:31 AM
My rudder broke one time, and using reverse was the only way to steer. Now is when things get complicated. You would think a boat in forward would hold a straight line. No. As the prop spins, it "torques" the boat one way. Usually to starboard. So as I drove a little, I had to reverse a little, drive a little, reverse a little... Less learned, if you get shallow and hit mud, do no back out of it. Get out of the boat into the water, and push it.

I just keep imagining those cheap little RC cars with the reverse steering only. You back it up and the wheels automaticaly go in a right reverse turn then you go forward again LOL