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polar21
11-17-2009, 05:36 PM
I was reading the thread about installing pop-up cleats and a question popped into my head. Actually, a scenario followed by a couple of questions.

What happens if you are out on the lake/river/bay and your boat breaks down. There are no other boats around and you need to throw out an anchor. Where are you supposed to tie your anchor off to if there are no cleats on the boat?

Also, how many of you actually carry anchors on your boat?

I am a saltwater fisherman at heart, and when you are 30 miles out in the open water, all safety equipment needs to be in top order. Where I ride, especially this time of year, there are not that many boats around to give me a tow back to the dock (I typically ride on a river with no houses on the bank) if the boat decideds to crap out. What do you think?

sandm
11-17-2009, 06:03 PM
I carry an anchor with 50 yards of rope.
I would tie it off to the tower legs or the rear eye if it was a worst-case scenario. also carry a marineband radio. sheriff's have 2 channels that they monitor.

Razzman
11-17-2009, 06:45 PM
Well first off all inboards have cleats now and have for years. I personally don't know anyone that doesn't carry an anchor either.

I carry an Anchor Buddy & 16lb. river anchor for shallow anchorage. I also carry 100' of anchor rope with a Danforth style anchor for deeper waters. Both have stainless carabiners I attached to the ends to attach to the bow strap eye loop. That is the only place i attach to unless I'm attaching both then one will attach to a rear lifting loop.

Also by USCG law i have a paddle so in worst case were paddling, never had to do it though. Especially since if we were to break down any lake in my region has plenty of boats around to tow us in if needed.

sandm
11-17-2009, 06:48 PM
sure about the uscg law on the paddle?
we have been inspected the last 2 years, I don't carry one, and both boat ramp sheriffs told me that is not required.

Razzman
11-17-2009, 06:50 PM
Absolutely sure, in Cali it's on their list and they enforce it.

yearround
11-17-2009, 07:02 PM
I would agree with Razz on the paddle requirement. i would never be out with out one anyway.

i keep anchors in the bow of hte boat so that i always have them. i keep my spare prop, anchors, case of water bottles in the bow. i think each anchor has about 150' rope (50 yards for sandm)

sandm
11-17-2009, 07:05 PM
must be a cali thing. the pontoon we rented in florida did not have one, and it's not on the list in idaho, nor can I find it in the uscg website. did find this as the only "nationwide" listing. seems that some states vary and change the rules a little..

The owner and/or operator of a vessel is responsible to carry, store, maintain and use the safety equipment required by the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG).
All vessels are required to have onboard a wearable USCG-approved personal flotation device (PFD) for each person. The PFDs must be of the appropriate size for the intended wearer, be in serviceable condition, and within easy access. The State of Florida urges all people onboard a boat to wear a life jacket.
Vessels 16 feet in length or longer must also have at least one USCG-approved throwable Type IV PFD that is immediately available in case of a fall overboard.
A child under the age of 6 must wear a USCG-approved Type I, II or III personal flotation device while onboard a vessel under 26 feet in length while the vessel is under way. "Under way" is defined as anytime except when the vessel is anchored, moored, made fast to the shore or aground.
Vessels with built-in fuel tanks or enclosed compartments where gasoline fumes can accumulate are required to carry at least one fire extinguisher (depending upon vessel length) which is approved for marine use.
All vessels are required to carry an efficient sound-producing device, such as a referee's whistle.
Vessels less than 16 feet in length are required to carry at least 3 visual distress signals approved for nighttime use when on coastal waters from sunset to sunrise. Vessels 16 feet or longer must carry at least 3 daytime and three nighttime visual distress signals (or 3 combination daytime/nighttime signals) at all times when on coastal waters.
The use of sirens or flashing, occulting or revolving lights is prohibited except where expressly allowed by law.
Recreational vessels are required to display navigation lights between sunset and sunrise and during periods of reduced visibility (fog, rain, haze, etc.). The U.S. Coast Guard Navigation Rules specify lighting requirements for every description of watercraft. The information provided in the following link is for vessels less than 65.5 feet/20 meters in length: http://boat-ed.com/fl/course/p4-9_navlights.htm.

zabooda
11-17-2009, 07:11 PM
No cleats and never needed them. 100 foot of rope, chain and a Danforth. Everyone's situation is different but I wait until I get to shallow water and walk the boat to a beach or float down the river until I reach civilization and use a cell phone. Some reservoirs are very remote and very deep so an anchor won't reach 400 feet down and no cell phone service so you hope for someone to come by. That is why you let people know where you are going and when you will be back. The places I go a satillite phone would be nice but it will still take a day for someone to come. Have a lighter and save your food and beer for the night and build a fire on the beach.

DOCDRS
11-17-2009, 07:50 PM
we are required to have 2 paddles in canada. so we can get there twice as fast i guess. Oh and if on a seadoo you only have to wear a pfd if you dont have paddles. if you have paddles you don't have to wear a pfd, but you need one on board.......ever tried to paddle a seadoo? not bloody likely unless there is no wind at all ....i've tried..... took the partiers 30 mins to realize the tube was no longer attached to the seadoo and come rescue us....:)

zabooda
11-17-2009, 08:17 PM
I don't carry a paddle because it only gets me dizzy. Besides, I had bad memories as a kid when our ski boat would conk out (it happened often - thanks to Chrysler) and the ensuing fight for the paddle and the little effect it had in going some place.

tazz3069
11-17-2009, 08:23 PM
In Vegas the only thing we are required is a throwable flotation devise. Depending on the length of the boat weather or it has a rope attached to it. I do have an ore in the boat because I do frequent California Lakes. Don Pedro to be exact. We also have to have an air horn in the boat. I do agree with the marine radio. I always threatened to get one but never have. My buddy has one in his boat. He has only used it once I believe. I need to look into that. By the way, I always have an anchor in the boat. It has never touched sand and will never touch sand as long as I own the boat. I purchased a box anchor and have a 50ft line on it. I also have a beach stake that I use. The rear is toward the shore while the bow faces the open water.

skiyaker
11-17-2009, 08:27 PM
I'm fortunate to have a more reliable boat than the boats my dad had growing up (we had a 16 foot Arrowglass trihull with a 85 hp outboard; yellow with black interior- now THAT was a boat) but I've always thought an anchor is a top level safety item just behind life vests- haven't had to use it much for this reason since the Moomba doesn't stall like my dad's boat used to but it did come in handy when I ran over a rogue rope out on the lake last summer and it wrapped around the prop- I think it would have been much harder to untangle from a moving boat.

brenpire
11-17-2009, 08:50 PM
Have you tried to paddle a Moomba? It doesn't work so well. I even tried the J stroke. Canadian law requires you to have One (1) paddle on board as well as a few other minor items.

I used to carry the minimum equipment. That was until one evening when the ski rope ended up around the prop after dusk. Trying to unwind the rope from the prop when it's dark can be a bit nerve racking to say the least. Not fun. Only one thing worse than that. Trying to paddle the boat home with 1 paddle. After 10 minutes of that I tried "swimming" the boat home (2 swimmers with a rope attached to the bow swimming) with 3 people on the swim platform kicking. With everyone going full steam we might have been moving at 1/2 MPH. Thankfully another boater stopped and gave us a tow.

The point is I now carry 4 paddles, and over 100 feet of anchor line. I also make it a point to bring my cell on the boat.

DOCDRS
11-17-2009, 09:10 PM
Have you tried to paddle a Moomba? It doesn't work so well. I even tried the J stroke. Canadian law requires you to have One (1) paddle on board as well as a few other minor items.

I used to carry the minimum equipment. That was until one evening when the ski rope ended up around the prop after dusk. Trying to unwind the rope from the prop when it's dark can be a bit nerve racking to say the least. Not fun. Only one thing worse than that. Trying to paddle the boat home with 1 paddle. After 10 minutes of that I tried "swimming" the boat home (2 swimmers with a rope attached to the bow swimming) with 3 people on the swim platform kicking. With everyone going full steam we might have been moving at 1/2 MPH. Thankfully another boater stopped and gave us a tow.

The point is I now carry 4 paddles, and over 100 feet of anchor line. I also make it a point to bring my cell on the boat.

oops, i stand corrected bren...thanks..... your right only one paddle ..... i did have to paddle my moomba once(good thing we had 2 paddles)....ran out of gas....luckily was only about150 ft from a dock and 1 km from my dock so i could go get some more fuel.....ever tried to start a moomba after running out of fuel?

brenpire
11-17-2009, 10:41 PM
I haven't run out of fuel in the Moomba yet. Luckly the Fuel gage has been accurate so far. What will happen if I do?

With regards to the PWC I find it crazy that you dont need to be wearing a PDF if you have a paddle on board. Like the paddle will help when you fly off the thig at 60mph.

polar21
11-18-2009, 09:15 AM
I cant see a paddle doing much good, especially if there is any type of current. Seems like the concensus is 100' of rope, a decent danforth anchor, and tie it off to the bow eye.

For those of you that say they tie it to the stern, be very careful with that. Although completely different circumstances, that is how the NFL guys died this past summer down in S. Florida (there anchor got stuck, they tied it to the back of the boat, powered up to pull the anchor loose, and the rope yanked the back of the boat underwater).

mmandley
11-18-2009, 10:14 AM
I carry a 15lb river anchor, 300 ft of rope. 1 section is on the anchor and the other section is a backup in case im in deep water. Often where i go tthe water is 100+ feet.

As for the pop up cleats, man there a god sent on my boat. I use the back one as a handle to get up on the trailer in garage, i use the front ones to tie of the anchor, tie up with boats, tie the floating rafts to so people can float and stay close.

I haven't used the D ring for an anchor yet but i think it would be the best place to hook it to. I just dont have a way to hook it there, i don't know what kinda knot would hold and be easy to remove.

kaneboats
11-18-2009, 11:35 AM
I installed the pop up cleats just for rafting and tying up. I used to have to use the tower to hold the bumpers. I only anchor using the bow eye.

Razzman
11-18-2009, 12:30 PM
I haven't used the D ring for an anchor yet but i think it would be the best place to hook it to. I just dont have a way to hook it there, i don't know what kinda knot would hold and be easy to remove.

Use an eye hook with a large eye like the one pictured, make a loop in the rope and run it through the and over the hook, tie a quick hitch once and clip to your bow eye. This allows you to use any length rope and adjust it to conditions without a complicated knot and it's easy to undo.

skiyaker
11-18-2009, 09:09 PM
I cant see a paddle doing much good, especially if there is any type of current. Seems like the concensus is 100' of rope, a decent danforth anchor, and tie it off to the bow eye.


the time when I did use the paddle was when I was still getting used to the "I can't steer in reverse" thing. I would keep it handy around the docks- we launch at a narrow and shallow ramp and once the wind turned me sideways with the starboard side toward the shore and I used my handy telescoping paddle to "pole" the boat back in the right direction. Also- after the infamous dock rash incident when my wife "drives" the boat I now have her get within paddle distance of the dock and just extend the paddle to me- I'll grab it and pull the boat in and that way I don't have to suffer while she attempts to throw me a rope.

Sled491
11-18-2009, 10:33 PM
I thought cleats were still an option on our boats? Never the less, I have them and they are great for docking and rafting. Anchor always off the bow Eye. We have a Richter Anchor (my opinion the best) with 100 ft 3/8 rope.

Razz, I like your adjustable hook idea, I thing I will steal it :)

If you don't have cleats, you have the back two rings and the bow ring which you can always make do with.

We have paddle, but I don't think it has ever seen the light of day

Razzman
11-19-2009, 09:29 AM
Steal away Sled! :p

Sled491
11-19-2009, 05:27 PM
Why thank you :)

viking
11-19-2009, 08:57 PM
since we're looting I'll take some of it too :D

jmvotto
11-20-2009, 09:19 AM
NY has the paddle, flares, whistle anchor with 100ft of line and a throwable as required.

Never used any of them yet. the lake is big enough we tie up and just drift. Cleats are used for docking and tieing up.

Razz, i am taking that idea as well, you never know.

Razzman
11-20-2009, 10:46 AM
Bunch of freaking thieves! :p

For those doing this make sure to get the right size with a hook opening to accommodate the large diameter bow eye. I had to return the first and buy a second one when the first one wouldn't clip over the eye!

Sled491
11-20-2009, 08:27 PM
Razz good call.

Just can't trust those guys from the east can ya :D