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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Lighthouse Point, FL
    Posts
    208

    Default

    Now Im not saying this is cost effective but just shows what can be done with paint. Some of these paint jobs cost more than the boats we own but they are pretty cool in my book. I know what I paid to paint Elmo and it is by no means cheap for the design work and then paint. There are a lot more pics on these guys sites but please move away from the keyboard so you dont drool on the keys. Some of these paint jobs run well over $100,000.00!!!!!!

    Paint:

    http://www.taod1.com/applications/Ph...emID=275&cid=9

    http://www.taod1.com/applications/Ph...emID=264&cid=9

    http://www.taod1.com/applications/Ph...emID=255&cid=9

    http://www.taod1.com/applications/Ph...emID=220&cid=9

    One of the current toys I have access too

    http://www.taod1.com/applications/Ph...temID=71&cid=9

    http://www.taod1.com/applications/Ph...emID=111&cid=9

    Did the design work on Elmo:

    http://www.grafikefx.com/
    Last edited by 11 Outback V; 04-18-2011 at 08:45 PM.
    REALLY????

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Pensacola, FL
    Posts
    1,537

    Default

    When I purchased my last boat at a MC dealer. I arrived to look at a boat that I was on the internet. It was the same boat, but in red instead of black. The red boat had been damaged in an accident and they had just repainted the damaged side. I was initially afraid that was the boat I was going to be looking at, but it wasn't. The dealer said that they paint boats that have damage often.
    As long as the boat is prepped and you use the correct type of paint (I don't know what that is), it is probably an option. Doubt that I will ever try it.
    1997 MasterCraft 205

    2008 Moomba Outback
    1999 MasterCraft Sportstar OB
    1992 MasterCraft 205
    1999 Malibu Response LX
    1987 Marlin Magnum Skier

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Clarkston, MI
    Posts
    146

    Default thanks

    thanks bro, that is what I was thinking
    Matt Glenn

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    2,265

    Default

    I'm not saying "it can't be done" - I'm just suggesting that it might be more cost effective to look at a wrap. To get it done right might be as much as the boat itself?? I could be wrong?
    2007 Moomba Outback - waiting for summer!

    Why Not? Play Hard! Get wet

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Pittsboro, NC
    Posts
    326

    Default

    My 1st boat I purchased was super cheap from a boat repair shop that had repaired the boat for an insurance company, then the customer did not want the boat any longer. It was damaged by a tree falling on it and crushed the side and a limb went thru the hull. Now this is all this company did was fiberglass repair on boats. They painted the complete boat and cleared it you couldn't tell it had ever been damaged. I never had any problems with the color fading, scratching, keeping clean or hazing. I kept the boat almost 10 yrs. before I sold it and the paint looked as good as the day I bought it. If done correctly I don't believe it would be an issue down the road.
    Patrick
    '08 Mobius LS. 4 Blade OJ 13x13 Prop.
    Kenwood KMR440U & RC107MR, T600-2 Rockford Fosgate powering 2 Liquid Acoustics 8" HLCD, Kicker SKM10 subwoofer
    5 light- light bar.

    Live life today!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Carlton Oregon
    Posts
    5,967

    Default

    I think it would look great painted, or wrapped. I personally don't care for wraps because once you damage it you cant fix it.

    As for painting it i have no input on longevity but i assume as long as you care for it then it will stay new looking.

    Gell coat is simple because its so thick you can damage it and have it fixed. Its no cheaper then paint though i can tell you that from Gell coat repairs costs i have seen.

    One of the nice things about Gell coat is it is repairable pretty easy but almost anyone with a little experience but at the same time i have seen plenty of high end boats and low end boats with crappy faded cloudy gell coats. This is just a lack of taking care of it. Same as paint.

    I say if you want it painted and the guy is using the correct types of paint then go for it. Get a lot of clear coat sprayed as this is what really protects the colors.
    Malo <--- Means--Evil or Mean One. This explains a lot.
    2013 Mojo 2.5 Skylon Tower. Bestia < Beast >
    Exile ZLD
    6 SX65M Cabins
    6 XM9 Towers
    1 XI Big 15 Woofer in a custom Fiberglass box
    1 XI 1K Harpoon
    2 XI 800.4
    1 XI 2500.1
    2 Interstate 2400U 6V Golf Cart Batterties
    Custom 1 Off Evolution Cover

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    1

    Default Painting a skiboat

    Hi everybody, I'm the buddy Matt referred to that will be painting his boat. I registered on this site so I could get some good information out there concerning painting your Moombas, as there has been some incorrect responses to his concerns.

    First off, I wanted everyone to know that my opinion is unbiased, as Matt is a good friend, and I'm painting it for basically my cost for the job. (I figure this is worth at least a few free pulls behind his boat haha) I have almost 15 years of fiberglass and paint experience, both in the marine and aerospace industry, so I'd like to think I know a little about what I'm talking about here.

    There is a difference between painting a boat, and painting an airplane. The paint on an airplane must withstand much more abuse than the boat for the most part. It experiences extreme temperature changes, as well as strikes from ice and debris at over 200mph. The paint that is used for planes usually are of two varieties, Polyester Urethane and Acrylic Urethane. I will be painting Matt's boat with Acrylic Urethane, PPG Concept to be precise.

    For Matt's boat, I will be painting the sides of the hull, which is ideal for paint as it isn't on the bottom where wear is a concern from the hoist or trailering it. Here a gelcoat would be preferable, although not necessary. Also, there is no foot traffic here, like your deck or the walkway between the cockpit and the bow seats. Again, gelcoat in these areas will hold up better than paint, but paint would still do fine in these locations. Paint is easier to repair than gelcoat as well, making it cheaper in the long run to maintain.

    For those worried about polishing paint, you shouldn't be. Using the right polish, like 3M's Polish or even Micro-polish, you can remove waterspots and even light scratches without a problem. The biggest issue for paint, and even gelcoat, is the owners maintenance. Most boat owners i know don't know how to properly care for there gelcoat/paint. I would recommend polishing the boat, preferably when you take it out at the end of the season. If this hasn't been done in awhile you can step up the polish to 3M's rubbing compound, then use their polish compound, then you wipe off any leftover compound residue, then apply ONLY pure carnuba wax. This gives the paint/gelcoat the oils it needs to protect it from oxidizing or absorbing any unwanted material (gas or oil etc.) Use a variable speed polisher, Makita makes an excellent one, but if you are on a budget, Harbour Freight's got one that will work. For Rubbing Compound, use the wool pad, for Polish Compound, use the foam pad. Always hand wax with Carnuba, never with a machine. And do as many coats as it takes until you wax an area, and it takes several minutes before that area starts to soak in and dry. That tells you that your gelcoat/paint has soaked in its fill of oils. Don't mess with the polish/rubbing compounds they sell at auto stores. Go to a Paint Supply store and go with 3M, it is the industry standard for a reason. If you have questions, the guys there can help you out.

    As for the guys that have seen boats painted with bad results, it's probably because they used the wrong paint or wrong materials underneath the paint. Also, the paint job will only be as good as the prep work, so for the guy who painted the top of his boat with poor results, I would imagine that had something to do with it. The guy whose dad painted a boat 30 years ago probably used an enamel, which is hard to spray with good results, and also hard to wetsand and polish. DuPont has a product called Imron, which is a good enamel, but they have reformulated the product awhile back, as it was chock full of toxic chemicals. The reformulated version isn't nearly the same as the old one and I wouldn't advise using it. The two paint systems that will work, as I mentioned before, are Polyester Urethane, or Acrylic Urethane. The Industry standard for boats is AwlGrip, a polyester urethane. There are others, like Sherwin-Williams Jet-Glo, which is marketed for Airplanes, but they will work just fine too. These are slightly tougher paints, but they are also very expensive and harder to work with. I suggest a good Acrylic Urethane, like PPG's Concept or DuPont's ChromaOne. When used with their High-Solids Hardener, you get a beautiful and durable finish. The cost is pretty reasonable and they are a dream to spray. Stay away from the off-brand products, like everything in life, you get what you pay for.

    I hope this answers any questions anyone had or quenches any fears people might have had about painting their Moomba. I will be documenting this job on another thread so everyone can see what exactly goes into a job like this and can see the results for themselves.

    Eric

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Birmingham
    Posts
    1,162

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by spooky View Post
    I will be documenting this job on another thread so everyone can see what exactly goes into a job like this and can see the results for themselves.

    Eric
    I would be very interested in following the progress!! Please post pics while you are going through this mod. I have considered paint as well since I do not really care for the wraps.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Des Moines, IA
    Posts
    2,540

    Default

    They've been painting offshore boats (like the links above show) for years, so no doubt it can be done with great results. But you can remove some pretty significant scratches in gelcoat that wouldn't possible on paint. Plus there are many, many boat buyers that will never even look at a painted boat, so don't forget to factor in resale.

    It sounds like you've got your mind made up though, so don't let us naysayers keep you down. Good luck and post pics of the results!

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Clarkston, MI
    Posts
    146

    Default Started Project

    We started prep boat for painting. When we took off large logo on side there was a huge spider crack under it. Looking at it , it looks like this was done at factory beacuse the try to hide it by moveing sticker forward compared to other side. Not Kool ! Any way it will be fixed the right way now. My body and I have been takening photos and will post everything when we are done which should be end of weekend.
    Matt Glenn

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