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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Lake Wylie NC Area
    Posts
    840

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    I do a handful of cables a week, so I buy flux and pellets in bulk, but for those that are only doing this for a couple of terminals on a DIY project, no need to buy pellets or flux. All you need is a role of Rosin-core solder with Flux in it. Most would have that around. Heat-guns are like $15.00 at Harbor Freight....and you can use it again when you do your next ballast upgrade. A butane torch and a bottle of butane are cheap at any hardware store.

    Soldering is a FAR superior electrical connection and you wont have to worry about it coming apart in a season or two.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Vancouver WA
    Posts
    2,631

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    Quote Originally Posted by lsvboombox View Post
    If you are installing battery lugs you dont need to crimp just solder them.


    Like this
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXDkN...e_gdata_player

    Just put something on the floor if you cant pull the wires out. You can do it with a much smaller pocket torch...
    Quote Originally Posted by MLA View Post
    I do a handful of cables a week, so I buy flux and pellets in bulk, but for those that are only doing this for a couple of terminals on a DIY project, no need to buy pellets or flux. All you need is a role of Rosin-core solder with Flux in it. Most would have that around. Heat-guns are like $15.00 at Harbor Freight....and you can use it again when you do your next ballast upgrade. A butane torch and a bottle of butane are cheap at any hardware store.

    Soldering is a FAR superior electrical connection and you wont have to worry about it coming apart in a season or two.
    This is how I do it. I messed around too many years with crimp fittings.


    PWI as usual...

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    11,347

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    On mind I twisted the connector off the end and then found a great ring connector at Home Depot that had it's own crimper built in -- I think they are normally used for lightning rods or ground wires or something. Worked great.
    My Mom said I'm not allowed to get wet!
    2008 LSV
    2000 Outback LS (sold)
    Exile Tunes
    PWI
    LLTR!!!!!!!!



  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    California
    Posts
    2,840

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    Quote Originally Posted by MLA View Post
    I do a handful of cables a week, so I buy flux and pellets in bulk, but for those that are only doing this for a couple of terminals on a DIY project, no need to buy pellets or flux. All you need is a role of Rosin-core solder with Flux in it. Most would have that around. Heat-guns are like $15.00 at Harbor Freight....and you can use it again when you do your next ballast upgrade. A butane torch and a bottle of butane are cheap at any hardware store.

    Soldering is a FAR superior electrical connection and you wont have to worry about it coming apart in a season or two.
    Not so sure in this case soldering is far superior, superior yes but not to the degree we'd see a remarkable benefit. A good quality 360 degree crimp connection is just as sturdy and will last just as long without issues. If it was that big of a deal automotive manufacturers would solder theirs. Using a handheld or hammer crimp tool however can produce a lesser quality connection and I have seen those work loose.
    2007 Mobius LSV

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Stillwater, Oklahoma
    Posts
    317

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    I use a hot air gun and solder. Clean.... Yes, hot air will make this connection and gets hot enough to wet it all out...

    I will say I have never seen a resistive solder joint from over-heating; that just is not possible. The usual cause will be moving the soldered joint around while still liquid. This will cause early crystallization of the solder and lead to a cold solder joint, (ironic). Brian's comment re: overheating probably comes from someones experience with not being able to hold still long enough while the really hot solder joint cools.

    That being said, the ABYC requires a crimp connection and prohibits soldering. I agree with their reasoning for new boat building but I can make a better connection with tools i have available putting rings on large wire with solder. You will never see me soldering small wire on a boat for the reasons ABYC cites.

    Phil
    Kicker
    Last edited by philwsailz; 03-19-2012 at 01:15 PM.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Dallas, TX
    Posts
    880

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    Phil,
    I am a proponent of first crimping, then soldering and then heat shrinking. Our soldered connections have lasted in the field since 1998 when we started our dedicated marine division. I am not familiar with the ABYC standards but I have read comments about the solder fracturing under stress. I believe that would apply to those connections terminating into a circuit board where the un-strain-relieved weight of the cable times shock and vibration could place an inordinate amount of physical stress on a connection that is structurally dependent on the solder joint. If that is the case then that would be a very bad thing to do. But I wonder if those circumstances are out of context with what we normally do in audio and lighting. Would you mind being more specific on this. Inquiring minds want to know....at least one does.

    David
    Earmark Marine

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Pacific NW USA
    Posts
    511

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    yes Phil - thats exactly what I mean by over soldering. Same can happen without proper cool down. Every rookie does it once (moves the cable to fast). I've seen soldered joints last upward of 15+ years, and think if one really wants to do it primo: crimp+shrink+ solder is pretty much a weapon of perfection.

    -Brian
    Exile

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Traverse City, MI
    Posts
    2,408

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    ABYC Commentary on soldering:

    Another common misconception dictates that the best of all connections is a soldered connection. However with stranded wire, the solder bonds the individual strands together, making a solid, inflexible wire. ABYC standards prohibit soldering as the sole means of making a connection because the newly solid wire is subject to cracking or breaking through vibration and flexing. A more practical solution is to use a crimp connector described above. Wires should never be joined simply by soldering and taping (or heat shrink); however, if solder is used, use only 60%/40% rosin core or solid solder, soldering after the butt connector is crimped. Acid core solder as used in plumbing may never be used in any electrical wiring.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1

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    Whether you need to cut depends on what you are doing and capabilities you want. If you just want to add a house battery that can parallel to start the engine if needed there is little reason to cut into the 2/0 engine run. Just connect up to a free post on the existing battery.

    Your arguably a little better off being able to select the battery you want to use vs. separate or parallel only options to isolate a bad battery with an internal short..etc. With most 1,2 switches you also get a bonus "off" switch to the engine.

    Personally I don't see the benefit in cutting into the engine run. You could isolate the battery manually if you really needed to and the existence of the "off" position to a curious guest while the engine is running can blow the voltage regulator.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Lake wallenpaupack PA
    Posts
    846

    Default

    Pp terd, thats an interesting user name.

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