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Thread: Boat Hours

  1. #1
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    Jan 2013
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    Default Boat Hours

    What would be considered a high number of hours on a boat engine? I keep shopping around and see nice boats with 500 hours and I can't help but think that seems 'high'. Comparitevly speaking, when I think of a used vehicle with 50,0000 miles that seems relatively low and I would imagine the engine hours for a vehicle with 50K miles might approach 5,000 hours.

    I'm sure someone else can answer this better than I can, but, I would think the life span of a 350 in a car vs. boat would be similar. The only big difference I can see in the same engine is the cooling system for marine engines. Obviously a boat with more hours will have increased wear on seats, hull and all of the other systems in the boat. Fortunately, some people take great care of their boats and high engine hours does not always mean lots of wear and tear.

    Is there that much more stress/load on a boat engine compared to a vehicle where I should be concerned about buying a boat with 500-1000 hours on it?

  2. #2
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    Default Boat Hours

    A well maintained boat that racks up the hours is usually a better bet than a 10
    Year Old boat with 100 hours.
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  3. #3
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    Default Boat Hours

    Quote Originally Posted by Boonejeepin View Post
    A well maintained boat that racks up the hours is usually a better bet than a 10
    Year Old boat with 100 hours.
    Agree 100%


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  4. #4
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    May 2011
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    Fort Worth
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    Default

    Yep... all about the care and maint. A good owner should have records unless they claim to do it all themselves.
    '08 Mobius LS

  5. #5
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    Nov 2003
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Boonejeepin View Post
    A well maintained boat that racks up the hours is usually a better bet than a 10
    Year Old boat with 100 hours.
    100% agree

    Quote Originally Posted by chawk610 View Post
    Yep... all about the care and maint. A good owner should have records unless they claim to do it all themselves.

    and a it should be fairly obvius that the maintence was done.
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  6. #6
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    May 2009
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Boatdrinks797 View Post
    What would be considered a high number of hours on a boat engine? I keep shopping around and see nice boats with 500 hours and I can't help but think that seems 'high'. Comparitevly speaking, when I think of a used vehicle with 50,0000 miles that seems relatively low and I would imagine the engine hours for a vehicle with 50K miles might approach 5,000 hours.

    I'm sure someone else can answer this better than I can, but, I would think the life span of a 350 in a car vs. boat would be similar. The only big difference I can see in the same engine is the cooling system for marine engines. Obviously a boat with more hours will have increased wear on seats, hull and all of the other systems in the boat. Fortunately, some people take great care of their boats and high engine hours does not always mean lots of wear and tear.

    Is there that much more stress/load on a boat engine compared to a vehicle where I should be concerned about buying a boat with 500-1000 hours on it?
    Did a little snooping and this is what i found, also almost every forum i saw said about the same

    The Life Expectancy of the Marine Engine

    The average marine gasoline engine runs for 1,500 hours before needing a major overhaul. The average marine diesel engine will run for more than three times that long and log an average 5,000 hours under the same conditions. The number of hours that a marine engine runs is very dependent on the amount and quality of maintenance over the years.

    The typical gasoline marine engine will run fine for the first 1,000 hours. It is at this juncture that the engine starts to exhibit small problems. If these small problems aren't addressed, they can turn into major problems which may make the last 500 hours of life difficult to reach.

    Interestingly, an automobile engine may run almost twice as long (3,000 hours) as your marine gasoline engine. The reason is that marine engines normally work harder and under worse conditions than automobile engines.

    A well-maintained gasoline engine run under the best conditions may well run for more than the 1,500 hours without major overhaul. However, many that operate under the most atrocious conditions of salt air, damp bilges, intermittent operation and pure neglect will certainly die early.

    Diesel engines are built to finer tolerances than are gasoline engines. They will accept much more abuse and often deliver, if well maintained, 8,000 hours of hard work before need a major overhaul. Theoretically, a well-maintained diesel may last the life of your boat. Since the average recreational boater logs only about 200 hours per year, the 8,000 hour diesel would last 40 years.

    Although diesels can add considerable cost to a boat, they should be seriously considered because of their durability, economy of operation and safety concerns. Diesel fuel has a much higher flash point than gasoline and does not present the same threat of explosion that gasoline fumes carry.

    Engines like to run long and steady. The shorter the running time between stops, and the longer the idle time between runs, the fewer the hours they will deliver before needing major repairs.

    The adverse conditions under which marine engines operate have a great deal to do with their longevity. What they really need is rarely what they get. Naval architects recommend that engine compartments should be supplied with lots of dry, cool (50 degrees F), clean air. The very minimum fresh air vent area (in square inches) for natural ventilation without blowers is found by dividing engine horsepower by 3.3.

    Two of the most important rules of thumb for engine compartment blowers on gasoline engines are that they should always be set to exhaust, not to blow air in, and they should be run for a minimum of 5 minutes before starting the engine.

    Two indicators that can alert you to potential trouble are the color of exhaust smoke and changes in the appearance of your oil when you check it.

    Exhaust gases from marine engines should be clear. Any color of smoke can warn you of potential trouble.
    Black smoke is the result of engine overload, a restricted air supply, or a malfunctioning fuel injector in the case of a diesel engine. Improperly burned particles of excess fuel are blown out the exhaust.
    Blue smoke is formed by combustion of the engine's own lubricating oil. This can be the result of worn piston rings, valve guides, or oil seals. The oil can come from an overfilled air filter in the case of a diesel engine or excess oil in the crankcase.
    White smoke indicates either water vapor from dirty fuel, a water leak into the cylinder or atomized, but completely unburned, fuel. Air in the fuel can also cause white smoke.

    You can not check the level and condition of your oil in your engine too often. You should check it at least once a day and preferably before every start. It is also a good idea to wipe the dip stick clean with your bare fingers and feel the consistency of the oil. Use the paper towel to wipe your fingers. You should rub the oil on the stick lightly between your thumb and index finger and feel for any foreign particles which could indicate contamination or metal parts failures.

    Weekend boaters checking the oil before starting should be suspicious of oil levels that are too high or too low.
    Too high a level might be a clue that water has found its way into the oil sump. You could crack the cylinder head, break a piston, or both, just by turning the engine over. The oil with water in it will also look "milky."
    Too low a level could indicate an oil leak that could lead to engine seizure. Look in the bilge to see if there is any oil residue. Many marine engines sit very low in the bilge and water is consistently in contact with the oil pan. Over the years this can corrode and cause pinhole leaks in the pan.

    Whenever there is a large deviation from normal, take that as an urgent warning. Start looking for more clues or seek the advice of an expert
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  7. #7
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    Jan 2008
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    It looks like you found your answer. However, a club boat that has 1000 hours in a few years will likely run fine for another 1000. There are plently of school/club boat with over 2000 hours before an issue.

    500 hours should be taken along with the year. Regardless of how many hours the boat has when you get it, I find it very hard to put hours on mine. I've been skiing 4 times and boarding 1 time in 2013, but have only put 2 hours on the boat. My 08 is just now at 200 hours.
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  8. #8
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    I'm up to 980 on mine and it has not skipped a beat! The Chevy 350 platform is practically indestructible.
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  9. #9
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    Aug 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by New Guy View Post
    I'm up to 980 on mine and it has not skipped a beat! The Chevy 350 platform is practically indestructible.
    I bought mine with 500hrs and now have around 650, you can tell just by looking at the boat if it was maintained or not. For added insurance take the boat to marina and have them check it out and perform a compression check...
    2002 Moomba Mobius LSV - Sold
    2006 Moomba Mobius LSV

  10. #10
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    Dec 2006
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    I have 750 hrs on mine. I do my own work for the most part and is all written down in the back of the owners manual. I also have all receipts from day one when I did take it to the dealer. I do change my oil every 50 hrs because of the load it is always under. Just put my second tune up in it this year. I think Wofleman131, Moombadaze and Kaneboats would attest of how my boat looks. Its all in the care and I believe I will get many, many more hours out of my engine.
    Jack Beams
    '05 Outback DD
    325HP EFI Indmar

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