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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Posts
    641

    Default Slalom Line Issue

    Okay, so I am trying to get back in to slalom skiing more this year and I am trying to ease into it. I saw where one of the pro skiers (Marcus Brown I think) occasionally will free ski off the tower with a long wakeboard line for a change of pace and for fun. So I did it a couple of times just to get back in the feeling this year.

    Yesterday, I decided that I was comfortable enough to get a little more serious, so I was going to ski from the pylon with my slalom line. Five tried and couldn't get up. Damn, okay hooked it to the tower, still couldn't get up. Weird. Okay, swap for wakeboard line hooked to tower, popped right up and skied. WTF? (Side note: I have had trouble getting up in the past with the slalom rope on pylon, just thought it was technique.)

    Do slalom lines wear out? It is a decent Straightline 8 section slalom line, so its not a crappy line, but it is pushing 8 years old. I am guessing it has something to do with the stretch in the rope? Any thoughts or ideas?
    Brian Roberts
    2001 Outback DD

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Pensacola, FL
    Posts
    1,544

    Default

    Your technique is poor and you need to fix it. The actual rope has nothing to do with getting up. A wakeboard line (assuming it is no stretch) will be more taunt under extreme loads. Getting up is not an extreme load. Your slalom rope needs to have some minor stretch in order to help you on the course.

    Your rope is too old to justify skiing with it. Buy an new rope. If your slalom rope breaks under load (which is when it will), you can have snap back that can damage your boat, you, and/or people in the boat. Normally it will be the driver getting hit in the head. I have been in a boat with a snap. Fortunately, it had a tube on it which protected everyone in the boat.

    Work on keeping your knees up to the chest and push down as soon as the boat pulls. Keep the ski tip out of the water at all times.
    1997 MasterCraft 205

    2008 Moomba Outback
    1999 MasterCraft Sportstar OB
    1992 MasterCraft 205
    1999 Malibu Response LX
    1987 Marlin Magnum Skier

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Snellville, GA & Lake Sinclair
    Posts
    7,023

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by maxpower220 View Post
    I have been in a boat with a snap. Fortunately, it had a tube on it which protected everyone in the boat.
    this may be the ONLY time having a tube on the boat was a good thing!
    Drew
    New ride: 2012 Mojo
    Old ride: 2008 OBV

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Posts
    641

    Default

    I figure my technique is partly to fault, it was just weird that I popped right up with the wake line, but struggle with the ski line.

    So when you say "push down", I assume you mean with my legs?

    Any recommendation on a new ski line? Is a 10 section worth it? I read that the Masterlines are really nice, worth the money?
    Brian Roberts
    2001 Outback DD

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Pensacola, FL
    Posts
    1,544

    Default

    Honestly, I thought the 10 section line was the best. I reality the number of sections doesn't matter as it takes years to get past 28 off. Straightline, Masterline both are great.

    Yes, push with your legs.

    The tube is a rope tube that goes from the pylon back 3-4'. It is there to stop snapback. Not a tubing tube.
    1997 MasterCraft 205

    2008 Moomba Outback
    1999 MasterCraft Sportstar OB
    1992 MasterCraft 205
    1999 Malibu Response LX
    1987 Marlin Magnum Skier

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Calgary Alta Canada
    Posts
    887

    Default

    Totally agrre with what Max has to say. 8 or 10 section makes no difference for about 95% of us skiers. Just have a decent quality rope,with the ability to shorten sections. A fresh rope has more stretch/ give and is a little more forgiving.

    As mentioned above i believe as well its something in your technique. Keep your knees to your chest, watch side to side balance, and when ready start pushing ,with legs to pull your self out of the water, Whether you are two feet in or dragging, Be a little patient. It will come....
    07 Outback DD

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Western PA
    Posts
    49

    Default

    I also start by saying "gear", which the driver puts it just in gear, gets the boat and me going in the same direction, (only for say two seconds), then say "hit it", gets the drivers attention that we are going, takes the slack out and less shock on the arms, gets me pushing on the ski.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    2,273

    Default

    +1 on the hit it part. Everbody likes to start a bit differently by I like a second or 2 just past neutral in gear to get the slack out of the rope and then full throttle! New drivers are hard to train. It's alot different than getting up on wakeboard or surfboard that's for sure!
    2007 Moomba Outback - waiting for summer!

    Why Not? Play Hard! Get wet

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Posts
    641

    Default

    Yeah, we do the couple of seconds of tension when starting. My wife is driving for me, and while a great skier, she is not as confident or consistent of a driver, but she is working on it. It is just frustrating to get right up in the previous weeks, and this week, really struggle with it.

    I keep my knees bent, and up as close to my chest as I can, but the I guess I am wanting the boat to pull me up, so I am just sitting there, not pushing down. I always come out the front with the ski tip going under and the boat pulling me forward over it.

    I'll try the pushing thing.
    Brian Roberts
    2001 Outback DD

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Rosharon, Texas
    Posts
    298

    Default

    Rope has no bearing on you coming out of the water at all. It does make it somewhat easier if it's on your tower vs being properly placed on your ski pylon. Your issue from what I am reading is probably 95% technique and 5% driver. Yes the driver does make a difference but if you can ski it shouldn't make a huge difference.
    You don't say what foot you ski forward with? A simple reminder that I like to give kids or newer slalom skiers is ski placement right before resistence force is being applied (boat pulling you forward)
    Left Foot Forward - get ski pointing to 10 - 11 o'clock position
    Right Foot Forward - get ski pointed to 1 - 2 o'clock position
    It's natural for the boat to want to pull your ski into you which causes you to get off balance. Once the ski is pulled under you during pull out you cannot get it back away from you and thus you're defeated.
    Also as stated above keep your knees bent too.
    2004 Ski Nautique 196 LE
    67" HO Syndicate A3 w/ Radar Strata Bindings

    Stay STACKED & Pull HARD!!!

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