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  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Snellville, GA & Lake Sinclair
    Posts
    6,964

    Default Winterizing and gasoline question

    Years ago there wasn't ethanol based fuel. Scroll back up to MLA's post. You may want to reconsider your plans.
    Drew
    New ride: 2012 Mojo
    Old ride: 2008 OBV

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Lake Wylie NC Area
    Posts
    744

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by moombabound View Post
    Can't remember if it was a separate article or a post on this forum, but years ago there was well qualified information suggesting it's the interaction with air that causes fuel to become unstable. Therefore I fill the tank right to the top of the filler neck each fall and it's ready to go in the spring. Stabilizer is added during winterization process by the dealer, but that article indicated that in the absence of air space, stabilizer has no benefit so is not even required.
    If so, stabilizer producers are giggling all the way to the bank.
    There are two thoughts concerning fuel and layup that are run together in your post, so please allow me to separate them.

    1) Completely independent of ethanol, fuel will begin to spoil (loose its volatility) with a few months. Now, gas actually begins this almost as soon as you put it in the tank, but it takes a number of months before the effects can be noticed. If you've even opened the gas cap on a car that been in the junk yard for a couple of years, the odor of the spoiled gas is one that you will detect right away. It is so obvious when compared to the smell of fresh fuel. Contact with air really doesnt speed up, or in any way, act as a catalyst for the spoiling, its just gasoline and time.

    Adding a fuel stabilizer slows the process, but it cant be stopped. With the computer controlled fuel systems, even with a long layup, the reduced performance from the remaining fuel, is hardly noticeable.

    2) Before the wide distribution of ethanol, and even after but before we fully understood its side effects, the thinking of the day was to fill the tank to near full. This took away the air gap in the tank, or at least reduced it as much as possible. The theory was, condensation in the humid air would fall out of suspension and collect as water in the bottom of the tank. In the spring, this would end up in the fuel system or water separator. If enough collected, it would certainly result in some performance issues.

    With the use of ethanol, the thinking is changing. Ethanol blended fuel, like brake fluid, is a natural sponge, and will absorb moisture from the air. Once the fuel has soaked up its capacity and becomes saturated, we get phase-separation. This is where the water and ehtanol fall out of suspension and end up a nasty layer in the bottom of the tank. Since its heavier then the fuel, it will get pulled through the pickup first. This will most likely cause issues. Since a gallon of ethanol blended gas can absorb about 3 tsp of water, you can see why the current thinking is to not fill the tank full. A stabilizer is still needed, and one that fights the effects of ethanol.

    The effects of ethanol on fuel systems is real. In the past 18 months, ive had to deal with it with my lawn equipment. A chainsaw, leaf blower, weed eater and as of last Friday, my pressure washer. Due to a project in the shop that needed pressure washed, I had to buy one. So once I get the old one fixed, i'll give it to my son. I have now started to add some stabilizer to my gas cans when I fill them up. Even now, I dont go out of my way to avoid ethanol. I think good maintenance is all thats needed. I guess my lawn equipment was getting a little ignored

    Now if anyone is laughing all the way to the banks, its the gas manufacturers. They get a gov subsidy for every gallon of ethanol blended gas they produce, then sell it on the open market. Its done in the name of emission reduction, but all it does is allow the refineries to water down the fuel and use less petroleum. This is a whole 'nother topic, so i'll get off my soap box.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,025

    Default Re: Winterizing and gasoline question

    Quote Originally Posted by moombabound View Post
    Can't remember if it was a separate article or a post on this forum, but years ago there was well qualified information suggesting it's the interaction with air that causes fuel to become unstable. Therefore I fill the tank right to the top of the filler neck each fall and it's ready to go in the spring. Stabilizer is added during winterization process by the dealer, but that article indicated that in the absence of air space, stabilizer has no benefit so is not even required.
    If so, stabilizer producers are giggling all the way to the bank.

    Lol.. That article is bogus..air space had nothing to do with it, you use stabilizer to prevent fuel from turning to varnish and clogging clog the fuel jets in the carb or fuel system.

    Keeping the fuel in the tank usable is an extra benefit, you need to run the engine after using it to circulate thru the entire fuel system. $$$$ for you take the boat to the dealer to have a carb or fuel pump rebuilt..

    I'm horrible at remembering to add stabilizer, but getting better, I've had motorcycles, snowblowers, trimmers all with clogged jets from sitting too long without it, not hard to fix but sucks taking everything apart..I try to use it all the time now...

    Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2
    2002 Moomba Mobius LSV - Sold
    2006 Moomba Mobius LSV

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    1,025

    Default Re: Winterizing and gasoline question

    Oh and just a side note, fuel isn't going to go bad or clog up in 6-12 months, however something may come up and you don't use it for year+ its gonna be really bad, example you break your leg and miss the entire next season or 2.. your using stabilizer exactly for that scenario.

    Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk 2
    2002 Moomba Mobius LSV - Sold
    2006 Moomba Mobius LSV

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    s.e. washington state
    Posts
    2,086

    Default

    In the fall, I empty the tank, add a couple of gallons of non ethanol gas with stable and run that through the engine. In the spring, I pump the two gallons out and put fresh gas in. My engine will never see crappy gas.
    1998 Mobius
    310 HP PCM

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    11,207

    Default

    I used to use my left over 50:1 outboard gas in the mower. Helped with mosquito control too. LOL!
    My Mom said I'm not allowed to get wet!
    2008 LSV
    2000 Outback LS (sold)
    Exile Tunes
    PWI
    LLTR!!!!!!!!



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