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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Huntersville, NC
    Posts
    45

    Default Water Sport Etiquette

    I know everyone here has experience with this situation, and I'm sure there is no real answer to this, but, WHAT CAN WE DO TO EDUCATE THE GENERAL BOATING PUBLIC OF WATER SPORT ETIQUETTE?? I'm just venting to feel better, but on my last outting, we were in a peaceful cove skiing some sets. When I pulled in, a Nautique just finished up a set, so we sat and chilled for few to make sure they were finished. When the water returned to glass, I had my go at it. After my run, a Mastercraft had its turn on the glass (and had the smallest, flattest wake of our three DD boats, mmmmm, the joys of a $50k tournament boat -- I'll keep my Outback, thank you).
    Anyway, I geared up to take my next turn and as I was about to plop in the water, a family in some I/O flat deck boat complete with giant white bumpers bouncing off the sides came plowing in with a youngin' towing on a wake board. They made it to the other end of the cove where the boy dropped, so I started to make my pass as soon as their wake died down. No sooner after I started zigging and zagging, they cranked up again -- at one point, they pulled out in front of us. Needless to say, we were not impressed by the family's lack of etiquette. At the end, they topped it off by dropping their rider in the very narrow cove inlet blocking the only passage in or out.

    I realize this is just part of boating and something that we have to deal with. The best thing to do is just relax and not let the blood pressure rise, but there should be some way of schooling the general boating public of simple watersports rules and proceedures. I'm not just talking wake boarders vs. skiiers. I'm talking about pleasure cruisers and families who don't recognize the sport aspect of the lake. Those who choose a calm cove to spin tubers around in, or who blast through glass water when there is clearly a skiier gearing up... it's nothing new, but we need to spread the word -- educate the uneducated. Maybe well gain some hardcore skiiers and fans in the process.

    [climbs off soapbox]

    Tim

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lake Hickory, North Carolina
    Posts
    1,390

    Default

    We run into those. We give them a big smile and wave. We nod knowingly, then slowly drive away, at wake surf speed, throwing the biggest roller we can their way. We wait out side the cove and return when we see them leave
    .
    B

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Naperville, IL
    Posts
    315

    Default

    We feel your pain. I've got my boat on a 550 acre private association lake. You have to be a property owner to drop your boat in and there is private security on the lake as well. Lots of 22 foot deck boats and pontoons. Everybody pulls their grandkids around on tubes. Even with a the same people on the water all the time, people don't have a clue about etiquette or even safety, but then again these are the same people that cut you off on the highway to and from the lake. Our association tried to put a 30 mph speed limit in (already have a 40 limit) because they are old and worried, but the skiers joined forces and convinced them it's not the speed as much as the operator and they already have rules in place for reckless operation. We ski early, late or when it's raining. Otherwise we float in a cove and stay out of the way. Sometimes we even throw a tube in a join the fray. Good luck.

  4. #4
    Sled491 Guest

    Default

    I'm afraid it's a lost cause. Like I've said before, any moroon with 30, 40, 50 K etc can buy a boat. But not onw of there dealers talks to them about rules of the lake. To be honest most of them don't even know what they are doing to us.

    Some dude pulling a wakeboarder on sunday did a 180 right infront of me while I was pulling my wife. I've been boating for over 40 yrs and had no choice but to shut it down, it's not worth the close calls.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Lake Quacumquasit - MASS.
    Posts
    31

    Default Etiquette

    I think the main issue is that most of the folks who invade our pristine waters don't realize what affect they have on the others around them.

    The best course of action is to slowly cruise up to the offending boater, introduce yourself and calmly explain that the sets you are running are difficult to do with all those boat wakes and is it possible for them to stick to another part of the lake for a short spell until you've gotten your sets in.
    We had this issue a few years ago, I was pulling my boys on wakeboards and we were just killing the ski course. The guys did as I suggested above and I was more than happy to oblige (and after having had it pointed out to me felt bad that I hadn't noticed what we had done).

    This was before my boys started true slalom skiing and we had an appreciation for how hard it is when the rollers start. We have the same issue now with barefooting.

    Bottom line, take the low key friendly approach, it usually works.

    If not, "accidentally" running over their tow rope works too......not that I would condone such un-neighborly behavior.

    Chris

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota and Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,121

    Default

    I have had very good results with this approach:

    1. drive up to them slowly and wave.
    2. Ask if we can work in a set with them.

    Surprising how many people get that. I even had a complete stranger come up to me a week later after we agreed to take turns and got wires crossed to apologize for getting out of synch.

    I have also made some pretty good skiing friends this way. What I found was that the wakeboard boat had some skiers in it, but they cold not ski due to all the ballast. So instead we just ski together in the mornings with our boat and they can leave their ballast in their boat. It has worked out good.

    But good luck with jet skis - they just don't get it.

    Dave
    If you believe something to be true, it will be - in it's consequences.
    http://bensonwdby.home.comcast.net/

    1999 Mobius - DD - 5.7L Carb - Perfect Pass

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Panama City Florida
    Posts
    1,798

    Default

    While pulling my wife through the course this year a couple of Jetskiis decided to try the course just behind her. I was thinking what do I do I can't shut it down she will get run over and I was afraid she might fall infront of the them. Luckily we made it to the end of the course and they went off in another direction. But I feel that the good ole bass fisherman gets just as angry with me when we drive past him on the way to the course. I don't think there is a solution for the idiots. When we see too many boats out there we just pack up the skis and head home.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Huntersville, NC
    Posts
    45

    Default

    The jet skis actually followed you through the course?!?!?! Insane stupidity. That's when you pull out the flare gun and SHOOT AT THEM. Wow.

    I had a pack of jet ski retards try to follow to get a shot at the wake during one of my last outings this year. Every time my girlfriend looped to run back the other direction she ran the chance of either hitting them or putting me in danger. Apparently they didn't know the difference between a ski boat and a wakeboarding boat. They left after they realized there was no wake being produced (that and a couple obscene gestures on my part).

    All in all though, I'd say about 90% of our runs are clean. Only 10% of them have negative effects due to other boaters, which really isn't that bad, I guess.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Panama City Florida
    Posts
    1,798

    Default jetskis

    The Good:
    Jetskis are great as they afford someone the opportunity to enjoy boating at a lower cost than ever before.
    The Bad:
    They have caused overcrowding.
    They are nimble to the point of being dangerous, especially with the teens.
    They allow people who have no experience in boating safety out on the water. Face it, boats are expensive it wouldn't be wrong to say that people with money tend to be more educated and more responsible. Anyone can purchase a used Jetski for next to nothing nowadays. Where is the dealer to provide a boating safety course? Low cost means expendable, who drives their 40k ski boat at a dock at high speeds and then turns away at the last second!? I could go on and on, sure the bass boats are fast but at least they care about themselfs and their boats. The plague of the water is the irresponsible jetski owner/operator!
    These are just some random thoughts flowing through my head now. Not meant to offend anyone. I gotta get me a flare gun now!!!!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Lake Hickory, North Carolina
    Posts
    1,390

    Default

    We've got better at picking our riding times and avoiding the flies. When they start showing up, we close the set and head down the middle of the channel, throwing them a nice wake to jump. Actually, it's kinda fun watching them.
    .
    B
    Learn all you can today. Tomorrow you may need to know it!
    .
    2004 Moomba Outback. Tower Speakers, amp, ballast, ssrr ... she's a cutie!

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