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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Northern Kentucky
    Posts
    110

    Default What the heck am I doing wrong?

    First of all, been a while. Good to see this board growing.

    Now my point. Been slalom skiing since I was five, am now an old man of 43. All my life, have done nothing but ski on a slalom out of a combo set. Can actually run the course on these pigs, so I do pretty well. Get up with both feet in bindings. Finally decided to try to pick it up, and bought a slightly used F2, high wraps. I can't even get out of the water on this thing. Is there a different technique here? Seems my tip immediately sinks and I can't get it out. Has been an after thought for me, never had issues on the old skis. Its the biggest one they make (6"5, 215lbs.), so don't think thats the issue. I can certainly return it, as I bought it from a local shop with a 60 day trial. Any thoughts?
    Last edited by Livindadream; 07-22-2008 at 09:18 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Pensacola, FL
    Posts
    1,544

    Default

    First, your combo set ski is probably a lot wider, especially at the tail. This helps getting up easier. When getting up on the new ski ensure that you are putting you weight on the rear foot to get up, but don't let the tip drop under the water. You should probably be on a 70" ski for your size. Cross check that also.
    IMHO, I recently purchased and sold a Connelly Concept (F3). I didn't like anything about that ski, though I bought it based on many good reviews. Perhaps you should try a different brand or ski. My wife skis on a Connelly FX, it is a shaped ski. It is a great ski, easy to get up on, and can ski into 36mph. Ask your local shop about shaped skis.
    1997 MasterCraft 205

    2008 Moomba Outback
    1999 MasterCraft Sportstar OB
    1992 MasterCraft 205
    1999 Malibu Response LX
    1987 Marlin Magnum Skier

  3. #3
    Sled491 Guest

    Default

    Dream, Max is right, you may not even be suited for the ski. But that doesn't change the fact that you should be able to get up on it. I am 42 and have similar background to yours except I've been on HP skiis for over 2 decades (quiet in the peanut gallery). Your big difference as was stated is your rear foot. In a RTP you can use your toes and move that foot all around. Now with the boot, your exit is going to be differnet. If you think about it you will realize when you are about to go over the front. It is at this point that you need to almost lock your back and pull with your body, not your arms against the boat. This will pop you up right at the very same point when you were going over the front. Also remember to keep your knees tight to your chest. I have also on occasion had problems with boarding shorts pulling back into the water due to a parachute effect. Look at all these things, one of them is it. One last thought, you said this was a used ski, correct? Did the previous owner move the bindings way forward from center? Worth a look.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    11,389

    Default

    Good advice. I thought of everything Sled said except the possibility that the previous owner moved the bindings. Sounds like something my brother would do to me. LOL.
    My Mom said I'm not allowed to get wet!
    2008 LSV
    2000 Outback LS (sold)
    Exile Tunes
    PWI
    LLTR!!!!!!!!



  5. #5
    Reese350 Guest

    Default

    Dream,

    Just a reference point. I'm 6'4" 215lb and just want through a similar transition from an Obrien Worldteam to a 69" Connelly F1X with double Wiley high wraps and absolutely love it. It's basically an F1 with a little bit wider tail. The guys at Wiley's were great in helping me select the ski based on skill/size/intent. I think it was around $450 shipped to my house.

    I hope you get it dialed in...

    Scott

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Northern Kentucky
    Posts
    110

    Default

    Thanks guys for all the replys. Kind of baffling, and certainly humbling if not an all out embarrassment. Have taught many to ski over the years, now teach can't even get up. Tough.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario
    Posts
    187

    Default

    Hi my dad just went through the same process. For years he used to get up with two and drop one. Mostly this was to protect his back as our old I/O took a long time to plane with a skier.

    Now we have the Outback and he decided to try again. He is 62 y.o. and 175 lbs and his having no trouble getting up on a Connelly Concept with both feet in and no back strain.

    He swears that the two most important things to do is to keep your knees tight to your chest with your arms around them and to keep you back up straight to prevent you from being pulled over.

    I would add to that to make sure that your ski is leaning about 30 degrees towards the forward foot side before the boat starts to pull.

    Good luck.
    2007 Moomba Outback
    99.999% Slalom, 0.001% Wakeboarding

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Johnston, Iowa
    Posts
    22

    Default

    I'd second all the tips so far - especially the knees in chest but, here's another angle to consider.

    I had the same problem when I went from my old EP with a RTP that I had been skiing on behind my parents big 'ol I/O Cobalt to my Connelly Concept with double boots behind my Outback. I have found that if the driver hammers it out of the hole I get pulled forward and under. What we changed was to take a steady progressive pull up to about 5ish mph and then hit it! This pops me up almost every time. I am quite a bit smaller than you (5'10"/175lbs) but I think the same "inertia" principle applies.

  9. #9
    Sled491 Guest

    Default

    Cutnh2o, excellent point. When we went from our Fish and Ski, to our Outback my wife was killing me, and I have skiied behind plenty our DD's. It took her a whole summer to get the feel of easing into the throttle. Now she is an expert. Funny you mention this though as we have recently taken up Surfing and now she needs a whole new type of feel. And my 8 yr old is deep water starting on his slalom and the requires another touch as well. Our boats are very versitile and as such require versitile drivers.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Tallahassee, FL
    Posts
    11,389

    Default

    I have an older brother that goes about 265 lbs. He's a pretty good skier. He normally skis behind his bayliner with a 90 hp outboard. He was here earlier this summer. I yanked the rope out of his hands a couple of times-- and I thought I was going slow and taking it easy. I wasn't able to get him out until I simulated the pull from his outboard. It was the longest- slowest- most painful drag out -- but it worked. My wife likes to take off real slow-- I mean REAL slow. I'm barely out of the water on a wakeboard and BEGGING for more power. Oh shoot, did I just slip into driver complaints? Better shut up.
    My Mom said I'm not allowed to get wet!
    2008 LSV
    2000 Outback LS (sold)
    Exile Tunes
    PWI
    LLTR!!!!!!!!



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